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"Quanti olivae constant?"

Translation:How much do olives cost?

August 29, 2019

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EddyHascal

Is there a specific Latin period where "constant" means they cost? The way I understand, it is a compound of "cum" and "stare" which literally means "to stand with" - either an agreement of a sort, or a literal coming together. Just a thought I had.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The first meaning for " cōnstāre" (cōnstō) is to stand together, you're right.
con (“together”) +‎ stō (“stand”).

There are several meanings listed for this verb, for instance, to cost money, or to cost with a figurative meaning, like costing pains, etc...

Meanings that are listed (wiktionary):

to stand together (also the etymological meaning)
to stand still; to remain the same; stand firm
to agree, correspond, fit
to be certain, decided, agreed upon, consistent
to consist, to be composed of

I've found a part of the answer you asked, though a dictionary entry with dates.

Common meanings:

  • Plautus and 2nd century BC.
    to stand still, (to stand with?)

  • Cicero and 1rst century BC
    to subsist (to maintain oneself, to be), to exist (to survive?)

CONSTAT (ALICUI, INTER OMNES) + infinitive proposition 1rst century BC (Cicero)
it is an established fact that, (for someone, for everyone)
CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr (+ ablative)
1rst century BC (Caesar)
cost v. intransitive: to cause penalties, sacrifices.
CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr + ablative 1rst century BC (Lucretius)
to be constituted by.
CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr + dative
1rst century BC (Cicero) to agree with

CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr + price in genitive 1 century BC (Cicero) cost v. intransitive, to require a payment to be acquired: cost. CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr EX + ablative
1rst century BC (Cicero)
to be composed of.
to consist of
CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, intr IN + ablative 1rst century BC (Caesar)
to depend on, (to rest on)
CONSTO, AS, ARE, STITI, STATURUS, INTR PARVO, PLURIS 1rst century BC (Seneca)

http://www.dicolatin.com/FR/LAK/0/CONSTARE/index.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarisaCan13

Your right. It's quite interesting. I may add to that , that we had a classical Latin and later on a modern one .The Latin of the decadence period is associated with the fall of The Roman Empire. Plauto's Latin is one of the classical ones, and so is Oratio's and many more. In the Italian schools, they teach the modern Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TLPurnell

I'm actually pretty sure that the word consto, constare is actually the origin of the English word "cost" via French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SRabier

Why do we use 'olivae' here? I'm not sure of the case, is it nominative or vocative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

It is nominative plural. You are not speaking to the olives.

Literally 'of how much (do ) the olives cost?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chrisvatin

What's the difference between quanti and quot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Quanti, here, is a genitive to ask a price, a fixed invariable expression (see my other comment) and quot is "how many", asking for a countable number of things.

Quantus is used to you ask for "how much", an uncountable quantity. How much do you love me, etc..


[deactivated user]

    Shouldn't "quanti" agree in case, number, and gender with "olivae?" If so "quanti" should be "quantae."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    No, quanti is always used like this when it means a price. It's a genitive (singular, always), from Quantus. A fixed expression when it's used to ask a price.

    You can think about it as "the amount's price", the price of the quantity, as quantus is "the (uncountable) quantity/how much".

    http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/adjective:quantus

    https://glosbe.com/en/la/how%20much%20does%20it%20cost


    [deactivated user]

      I see, thanks for the clarification.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

      So like, "the price of (object) is how much?" perhaps?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

      A word would exist for price. It's just simply, how much does (XYZ) cost?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

      I love the Italian, how much does this cost, quanti costa questa cosa?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giacomobern1985

      quantO costa questa cosa ;)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel862042

      Audio is too unclear for the testing


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

      Need to hear the printed v as our "W."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlatheaAnd

      Agreed. Olivae sounds like "orli why". It wouldn't matter as much in a normal lesson, but it's not very good for the purposes of testing out of a level.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

      Just wondering.. why can't it be olivas?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

      Because the olives are the subject of the sentence and so go in the nominative case.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latinitas476

      Is better to say "Quot nummis constant olivae?".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

      I think It's not better, as I've found many sentences in Latin books or example with constare, meaning to cost by itself, without mentioning the currency.

      It's like saying "How much does it cost?" and "How many bucks does it cost?", in fine, it's the same thing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

      What is the difference between quanti and quot? And by the way: I have read that quantus is an adjective. Are the words "interrogative pronoun" all Greek to Latin scholars?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

      In English Where/what/who are interrogative adverb, and also adjectives.

      -Quanti is the genitive of value here, used to ask for a price. It's a fixed expression.
      -Quantus is the interrogative adverb meaning you ask for "how much", an uncountable quantity. How much do you love me, etc...
      -Quot is the interrogative adverb meaning you ask for "how many", a countable quantity, requiring a number. 20 men, 60 candies, etc...

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