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  5. "She is kind."

"She is kind."

Translation:Illa est benigna.

August 29, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hectorlqr

What's the difference between illa vs ea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

"Illa" is a demonstrative, usually meaning "that," but it can be used as a simple pronoun, as it is here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

So is better use "ea". Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

This seems similar to how Germans often use the demonstrative 'die' instead of the regular pronoun 'sie'. (And 'der' instead of 'er'.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlderThanRome

As far as I know, both mean she but illa puts special emphasis on the subject, like "that one", for example to imply that the other ladies present are not so kind.

Both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

Does it require a pronoun? Why not "Begnigna est"? The English question did not specify That woman is kind...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You can write "Benigna est", or "Est benigna", as the pronoun-subject is not required here. Please report when it's not accepted (report button)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

Is "est" required? Would "Illa benigna" be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

While there are authors who drop the verb “to be”, it is not some thing I would recommend doing to any learner of the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Have you got some examples?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

It seems to be common in proverbs, but not exclusive to them.

Nil desperandum.

Ars longa, vita brevis

Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas Plato is my friend, but truth even more my friend (Ammonius, Life of Aristotle)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eaden0

It is also common in latin prayers: "Adjutorium nostrum in nomine domini".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yodo9000

In Bengali, an Indo-European language this is actually done almost all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

I can add Russian and, I think, most of the other Slavic branch of IE, too.

And Arabic and Hebrew are non-IE languages where this happens regularly in present-tense expressions using 'to be'.

Plus, as you might expect, this happens all the time in sign language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emackerley

Why not "Benigna illa est"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

That should be accepted, I think!

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