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"Livia, quaeso, da mihi vinum."

Translation:Livia, please give me the wine.

August 29, 2019

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hectorlqr

I could have sworn quaeso was going to mean cheese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

"Calceus" is cheese. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wisdom_of_words

"Caseus" is cheese. "Calceus" is (a kind of) shoe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilchymis

Thanks for clarifying that, that makes more sense (shoes being hard/frim). I was wondering how caseus became calculus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuisEstHaecSimia

Calculus is the Latin term for a pebble, as in the pebbles used in calculations. 'Calculi', the plural nominative form of calculus is also the medical term for kidney stones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

Beware false friends!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpiano2

This narrator is starting to sound desperate for this wine. Can we get him some help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/remysapienza

I think the Classical pronunciation of "quaeso" is /kʷae̯.soː/, not /ˈkʷae̯.zoː/. Because as far as I know, the "s" is always pronounced with /s/. Am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TERRANCEBO17

You're correct - in Classical Latin. All 'S's should be unvoiced. There are too many deviations from Classical pronunciation for it to be that version of Latin, and since the pronunciations are inconsistent I'm going with some sort of Modern/Neo/Mediaeval Latin version:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

Time to use the Calabrese system


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sa967St

Which is the preferred way to say please? I learned to use amabo te from the Wheelock's Latin textbook.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Amabo te. Quaeso typically translates to "I seek"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouiviVeterus

Yeah, 'quaeso' usually means 'I ask' or 'I seek' but if you're translating really loosely I guess you could get 'please'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

Both are acceptable.

Quaeso is authentic classical usage for 'please'.

As the course progresses, all options will be considered.

Consider the difference between 's'il te plaît' and 'je t'en prie'... there is a similar difference and yet similarity in the Latin use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, but "je t'en prie" doesn't mean please in French, but rather" you (singular) are welcome".

If you say "Je t'en prie'" to ask something, it's begging (not please), as "Je t'en supplie".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlatheaAnd

I think AJ72T may have meant "je te prie" rather than "je t'en prie". "Je te prie" is one way of asking for something politely, though maybe more common in formal writing than in speech - "Nous vous prions de bien vouloir..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

Amabo te = I will love you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BasJongene

He sounds like he already had enough wine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

From your experience in bars? ,;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieSy

Minime, Marce! Tu nimium vīnī habes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gunungFR

Tibi gratias ago, cur ita iacerent acervi ex doctrina sum nimis iocosa. LOL Ego usus Google Translate (because I am a beginner). Et dixit quis ego sum probabiliter non ad risum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

No-one:

Google Translate: Thank you, why do they lie in piles of teaching experience, I am funny. And who am I probably would not make them laugh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineM727245

Why isn't the verb at the end of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

It's common, but not an absolute rule, for imperative verbs to come at the beginning of a sentence. The often stated rule that the verb has to come at the end of a sentence is incorrect in any case. Word order in Latin is very free.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsperWolf

No, marcus, you are an alchoholic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yodo9000

Is Livia, I beg, give me wine. too dated as a translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KlausLuger999

Livia! Vinum! Nunc!!! (Imperative is understood from context as Livia shakes with fear and dread!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KlausLuger999

"Livia, please! Give me wine!" She said, desperately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

There isn't just an adverb or interjection for please, is there? We have to use verbs?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

No, there is no direct equivalent of please. Quaeso is literally "I ask".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

Thanks for answering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LIHcf

The wine, Livia! What do you mean, I had enough??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Quaeso should not be used as "please." Please should be the idiom "amabo te."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

I'm pretty sure Cicero used "quaeso" as "please" so I don't see what's so bad about it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

That's far too proscriptive. There are a number of politeness expressions used to soften imperative sentences, either with or without the explicit object te. These include:

quaeso 'I ask'
amabo 'I shall love'
obsecro 'I implore'
oro 'I beseech'

In Roman comedy quaeso is more predominately used by male characters and amabo by female ones.

A couple of examples from Plautus:

age quaeso mi hercle translege "go on, please, read it through for me, by Hercules" ( Asinaria)

propera, amabo "Be quick, please" (Bacchides)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

My two Latin dictionaries offer "sis" from "vi sis" for [please]. It seems more colloquial. Quaeso, as indicated above was used by Cicero, so we can confidently conclude it's a formal term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TERRANCEBO17

I swear I heard both voices read this the first time! It made no sense, so I replayed it and it was alright - just one person speaking (oh, and I played it a third time, just to be sure:) . Either I'm having auditory hallucinations (again??:), or there was a glitch in the playback. Just thought I'd mention it in case some other people were experiencing similar. (Betas love any data:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineM727245

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