"She lives in Philadelphia."

Translation:Ea Philadelphiae habitat.

August 29, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKirk9

The Ea is unnecessary, the personal pronoun is only used in Latin if you want to stress it, in other cases (like here) the ending of the verb does the trick alone.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

No, without the ea we wouldn't know if it's he or she or even it.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

But in authentic Latin, often you don't know he/she/it without examining the surrounding context. (And the need to know that information is an English need, not a Latin one.) By that reasoning, we need to always write "is" when the subject is "he" -- which certainly isn't the situation in Latin texts.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

No we don't. When you get Latin to English, the ea is there to tell you she, but when going from English to Latin you can omit the ea.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

It sounds like we agree that "Philadelphiae habitat" should be a correct answer??

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes, of course. I'm sorry I wasn't clearer earlier. If it was rejected you need to use the Report Button.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gooddog113

For the sentence to be correctly translated, it should have the "in" preposition with the ablative. It is currently being translated as the genitive "of" rather than the ablative "in"

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

It's a locative. It looks just like the genitive, and is only used with cities. You'll often see Romae too, in the locative.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

In the Tips and Notes, they talk about the locative of Rome, New York, and Corinthus. Then they say other locations get the preposition a + ablative, mentioning for example "in Italy" = "in Italia." So I thought this was one of those cases. However, re-reading that section, I see they say that places ending in -a generally change to ae.

Vita flumen est. Omnia mutantur, nihil interit.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

With names of cities, towns, and small islands, the locative imitates the genitive form for 1st and 2nd declension singulars, and imitates the ablative form for 3rd declension and for plurals. For the other locative words, it's domi (at home), ruri (in the country), and humi (in the ground). Italy is a country (or a region) and therefore uses in+ ablative case.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosfet07

Is the locative obligatory for nouns that have it? Can we still say "Ea in Philadelphià„ habitat" (via ablative)?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceClark8

No prior mention of ea.

August 31, 2019
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