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  5. "You have four female student…

"You have four female students and four male students."

Translation:Tu quattuor discipulas et quattuor discipulos habes.

August 29, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

Dropping tu should not be marked as incorrect. I reported. And also, habetis should also be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex191193

In my recollection from my high school classes, personal pronouns are generally optional, unless you really want to stress someone in a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Quite correct, norto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margaritamix

Still marked incorrect as of march 14, 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

It would be useful to know the full text of your exact answer. It's possible it marked you wrong for something else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FirePotato

I think they fixed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria_Tuberose

Dropping tu was accepted on Oct 25, 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artmapuche1

I'm afraid that today, on Nov 11, 2019 it has not been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eamonn1963

My dropping of Tu' was also deemed 'incorrect' today being 2 Feb 2020. Clearly something is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

Insufficient information. You would need to copy and paste your exact answer here so we can help you see if there were any other errors or typos that were the real reason why the algorithm marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

Kevin353755

It has always been correct to drop the subject pronoun. You must have had other errors that caused it to mark you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vera460607

Same, today 27 April 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin353755

As of today july 17 2020, you can drop the TU and it wont be marked incorrect!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBookLvr

What duolingo says, goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

No. The course contributors are human beings with a lot on their plate. There will be error and oversights, and it is up to us to report them so they can be corrected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraKate

It is not necessary to repeat quattuor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Agreed. I also attempted to use -que in place of et, and that wasn't accepted.

I thought "Quattuor discipulas discipulosque quattuor habetis" was a reasonable way to put it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, I always submit a "my answer should be accepted," for the moderators to see and decide upon.

I've reported it again (using -que instead of et).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

Oh, by the way, how am I supposed to say the roman numerals within a latin sentence? Do I say it letter by letter like ee wuh (IV), do I say it with a stop like ee, w, or should I simply say quattuor? Are those numerals inflected in gender too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

You would say the number (quattuor). And numbers do not decline (except 1, 2, and 3).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyBear08

Why is this discipulas rather that discipulae? Did I get the definition of discipulae wrong? It is female student rather than femal students?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Discipulae = female students as a subject, or THEY (the female students). Discipulas = female students as an object, or THEM (the female students.)

In Latin , there's more than one type of object. Discipulas (accus. plur.) is either the direct object of the verb, as in "I have four (female) students," or it's the object of prepositions that require accusative, such as "I run towards ( = ad) the female students."

Other prepositions will require the ablative (cum discipulis, with the students).

Some structures will require the dative (Discipulis fabulam narro, I tell a story to the students).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

If the following is incorrect, please let me know.

magistra, discipula - female nominative singular

magistrae, discipulae - female nominative plural

magistram, discipulam - female accusative singular

magistras, discipulas - female accusative plural

magister, discipulus - male nominative singular

magistri, discipuli - male nominative plural

magistrum, discipulum - male accusative singular

magistros, discipulos - male accusative plural

For some reason, Latin has "magister" rather than (incorrect) "magistrus". Otherwise, the above would show a lot of regularity with male tending toward 'u', 'i' and 'o' endings where female tends toward 'a' endings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

You can see their declension tables here:

The grammatical genders are called masculine and feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Because it is accusative (direct object) and plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kia47

The 'tu' is not needed and a sentence without it should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

It usually is. If you told us your exact answer, we could perhaps find a typo you missed that triggered it to mark you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiobhanJac6

Why is "Tu habes quattuor discuplas et quattuor discipulos" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

Because Latin syntax is subject object verb, not subject verb object. It needs to be "Tu quattuor discipulas et quattuor discipulos habes."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caterina

Tu should be optional


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Translingual

I think the construction with "dative + esse" (with the object becoming the grammatical subject of the sentence, hence "discipulae/discipuli" in the nominative in that case) should be accepted to express ownership or relationship:

"Tibi sunt quattuor discipulae et quattuor discipuli." (Reported)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I find that these are accepted for a lot (but not all) of the Duolingo sentences.

Worth reporting and commenting on, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacques979754

Why not discipuli instead of discipulos?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

In this sentence, students are an object (THEM) and not a subject (THEY). Thus, the accusative plural form is required.

"You have four female students and four male students." In this sentence, YOU = the subject, the one who HAS something, namely the students: you have THEM.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nowens801

And discipuli again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

"Discipuli" is nominative. We need the accusative here, which is "discipulos".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Why must it also include habites, if that is the plural verb of "you"? Maybe the point of the sentence is that you are addressing the single teacher, establishing the difference between habetis and habes? But then, the sentence leads either way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Plural you, for this verb = habētis, "you have."

It's not clear in English whether the "you" that's being addressed is singular or plural; so yes, both habēs (you sing. have) and habētis (you pl. have) should be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ANKershner

"quattuor discipulas et quattuor discipulos habes" accepted as correct on June 5, 2020.

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