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  5. "Triclinium pavimentum habet."

"Triclinium pavimentum habet."

Translation:The dining room has a floor.

August 29, 2019

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

Yes, but for some reason it's covered with fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Languages127

That's why you gotta say it, it's so covered you cannot see the pavimentum!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasClarke9

"Where should I throw the fish?" "Dining room has a floor."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpet

Or it could be the other way around: "The floor has a dining room" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poncetius

Indeed, both are neuter words, both could be either nominative or accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenH0

In another thread I asked what you do in such a situation and was told you have to rely on the SOV word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

And context, which is of course lacking with this isolated sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesLupei

That's what I answered on my first try, since "The dining room has a floor" sentence seemed too obvious. Duo wasn't having it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annie555482

Most rooms without floors are called pits.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyIvyoftheWood

Even pits have floors. They're just farther down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

Underrated reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonDeAlberta

Until they fill up with fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rheunark

There wouldn't be a floor to throw the fish onto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

It's a bottomless void of fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johann311122

Unless you are in a space station.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Or the Restaurant at the End of the Universe...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenino85

Is it just me, or does this course have an unusually large number of "new" words that are not highlighted as such? I'm never sure whether I've forgotten a word or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LGFreeRock0828

I don't think the course creators have finished all the tips and notes. They seem to end at Food. Up to that point, they're quite good, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VinceNet19

as opposed to all the other rooms who do not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

Calling a triclinium a room is a bit of a stretch. Technically it's the three (tri) couches (clinia) arranged together so that rich people can dine while reclining.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

Lewis and Short do give a second definition (p. 1898, 1891 edition) of "a room for eating in, a dining-room, supper-room." It is a "transferred" definition, so presumably the word for the couch eventually came to refer (at times) to the entire room.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

The drunk and deceitful parrot throws the fish onto the dining room floor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fifione

How would you say, "He has a dining room floor?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

You would need to unpack that a bit. English allows nouns to be used as though they are adjectives, but that wouldn't work in Latin.

A dining room floor is a floor for a dining room. Or it might be a floor that is part of a dining room. The genitive construction is also used for a part of a whole.

Pavimentum triclinii habet.

https://latin.cactus2000.de/noun/shownoun_en.php?n=triclinium


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

I agree with your translation, but just to take your point a bit farther (that we need to "unpack" the meaning of the sentence in order to construct it in Latin), I think we could also use the following logic:

A dining room floor is a floor in a dining room. Let's use an ablative of place where:

pavimentum in triclinio habet.

All of which reinforces the fact that Latin is its own language, with its own idioms, its own style, etc.; it is not simply the way that ancient Romans spoke English. :-)

[Edit: fixed typo: lets --> let's]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

All of which reinforces the fact that Latin is its own language, with its own idioms, its own style, etc.; it is not simply the way that ancient Romans spoke English. :-)

You're speaking my language, Robert! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCousins

Excuse me, but has anyone else noticed anything odd about this course?

First of all, Duolingo introduces a course in Latin, a dead language. This is strange in itself, as Duolingo is a practical language learning platform, not an academic institution.

Secondly, the creators have made very little effort to explain the target language's grammar. Instead, they seem obsessed with the dumping of (preferably fatty) fish on easily accessible surfaces such as floors and tables.

Thirdly, a disproportionate number of commenters have profile pictures featuring cats.

What is going on here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

There are also modules on Klingon and High Valyrian. Where there is demand, people will supply.

Also, knowing Latin can be very useful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrenReiley

It is suspicious. The only obvious conclusion is that cats are interdimensional, time traveling beings conspiring, through DL, to revive Latin in converstaion. (Probably as a stepping stone to conversational Egyptian).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

A dining room without a floor is not a dining room, is a bottomless pit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a_h.m.e-t

What does this sentence mean? Really, i can't understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/triklogl

Unfortunately, the course makers won’t lose much time explaining to you the cultural interest of such a sentence, so you can die in your ignorance, wondering why it is so relevant to know such an expression, which occur to be totally pointless if you are not brought in to knowledge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

Thats why I value the Latin forums so much, where people are generous with their knowledge and greatly enrich the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanDigital

If you're wondering about the dining room without a floor:

https://www.dinnerinthesky.com/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

Which makes it extremely convenient when one is done reclining and wishes to walk home without an antigravity belt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barbara592867

Sententia recta est

Ordo verborum potest mutare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Et illud est bonum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

Triclinium ain't accusitive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

Both "triclinium" and "pavimentum" are neuter, which means the nominative and the accusative look the same.

https://latin.cactus2000.de/noun/shownoun_en.php?n=triclinium
https://latin.cactus2000.de/noun/shownoun_en.php?n=pavimentum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VesperEule

Why is it "triclinium" in this case, and not "triclinia?" I thought the ending "um" indicated a direct object, not a subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan837467

silly. You need an adjective!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai247906

Was expecting a boundless void


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

I put 'he has a dining room floor' which was marked wtong. Could it be a valid alternative translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You cannot use a word as an adjective for another word, like in English. (implied genitive in English)

You have to have a real genitive, or an equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

I don't think so... :/

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