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  5. "Noctu socii perfidi psittaco…

"Noctu socii perfidi psittacos interficiunt."

Translation:At night the deceitful allies kill the parrots.

August 29, 2019

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Were these the sober, friendly parrots. Shame on those deceitful allies!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

This keeps me glued to the Latin course: The Psittaci Ebrii Saga!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaDePanfluit

We shall avenge the parrots!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

Hoc est ex-psittacus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

Naw, the parrot is pining for the fjnords!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egcw1995

PINING FOR THE FJORDS!?!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Was "ex" used (also) like the modern "ex" in "ex-wife" in Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EstherJSamuelson

Not usually. Ex- means "out of" or "from," usually. the modern English usage has evolved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, I suspected that.
I have no idea how it started to mean "former" in old French (English got this meaning from old French), it's easy to see that it is because the meaning was "to go out from something", that it became "former".
But I don't know how it get this new meaning and lost the former meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr_Pig

Under rated comment. Here, have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arturo.belano

So much parrot murder!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

«interficio» can be a tough verb to memorize until you study its structure. Literally, "inter-make/do", almost like the English "to do in/away", as in "to kill someone". To visualize why they used this structure is tricky.

Possibly it comes from the idea of placing something between someone, like a weapon "going/being placed between" them and literally ripping them apart (nasty!). This idea also seems to apply to the verb «intereo», which means both “to go between” and “to die”, from «inter» and «eo».

The Romans really didn’t like the idea of ending up between something!

Think of "to do somebody in" and you should be able to memorize it faster.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tvindy
  • 1864

If you want a real treat, try the Danish course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rix62

Why do the spoken portions always sound to me like I'm being cursed by a priest?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMcAyRuo
R E P O R T T H E A U D I O

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colexander

I wonder if one of the contributors to this course owns a set of especially noisy parrots...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tvindy
  • 1864

Or he has a neighbor who does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeNesbitt1462

Owls must hate parrots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

How do we know who kills whom ? I translated "At night the parrots kill the deceitful allies"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark841597

Cases!

Your translation would be "Noctu socios perfidos psittaci interficiunt."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Thanks for answering


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I like your version better. Gotta let the parrots win sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBasse

What would it be "At night the allies kill the deceitful parrots"? Thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

Noctu socii perfidos psittacos interficiunt.

or more likely: Noctu socii psittacos perfidos interficiunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

The adjective always follows the noun it modifies in Latin, which seems backwards to English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Not "always".

In Latin an adjective can come either before or after a noun, e.g. vir bonus or bonus vir "a good man", although some kinds of adjectives, such as adjectives of nationality (vir Rōmānus "a Roman man") usually follow the noun. The adjective may also be separated from its noun by other words, especially in poetry.

(Wiktionary)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolinatheowl

Jeez, Duolingo just gets darker and darker, doesn't it? First it's hitting, then it's graves and death, and now it's murder...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindsayCox0

I must say, you get a better class of comment on the Latin course. Keep them coming chaps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

I would stand in line in the rain to see this movie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

What is wrong with "perfidious" as a translation of "perfidus"? It was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stivusik

It should be accepted and now will be. BUT... it is helpful to make a distinction between derivatives (English words derived from Latin) and translations. Words borrowed into English from Latin very often change their meaning, and they always have a hoighty-toighty ring to them. It's good to get into the habit of translating basic Latin into basic English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

There are very few English words that are directly derivated from Latin. (10%). They are words in the science and the law fields.

"Words borrowed into English from Latin".
They are very rare, almost inexistent, except science/law terms.
90% are borrowed rather from old French.

So: Words borrowed in English from a Latin descend language is true.

Sorry to insist, but it's really important to mention. As the change in the meaning can be often found in the old French word (90% of the time). Considering the mother of the English word is the old French word, that is a different language from Latin, and you understand why the meaning changed.
It's the etymology science.

For instance, the most shocking example I see in this course is "to solicit", if you consider the Latin meaning, you can't understand the Modern English meaning. If you search for the old French meanings, you understand how it evolved, to give the modern English word.

You cannot search for a Latin root for an English word, without considering the full etymology path. How the meaning evolved progressively from Latin, old French, and then English (The meaning of the English words are often surprisingly close from Old French, and very different from Modern French)

Considering the English word is directly borrowed to Latin, and should have the same meaning that in Latin, is a mistake.

It's like saying that "fiesta", "Colorado", "ranch" and all the words that come from Spanish in English are from Latin. They are not. (Or like saying than Spanish word are from common Indo-European without considering they are directly from Latin.) They are not Latin words, they are Spanish words, turned into English words, and bring the Latin root with them because Spanish is a Latin language=
They bring in English the Spanish meaning, not the Latin meaning.

I think Spanish is the second source of Latin roots in the English language, after French. There is also a lot of words that went though Italian, including English words borrowed from French.
(ex: pantalone (it) -> pantalon (fr) -> pantaloon/pant (eng)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

Well, that escalated quickly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

At the rate they're being killed off lately, parrots might want to give some serious thought to seeking protection under the Endangered Species Act.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

No, I don't think that's necessary. Haven't you noticed that however often they appear to get killed, by the time we get to the next sentence, they're back again. One possibility is that they're actually zombie parrots. To quote from https://plantsvszombies.fandom.com/wiki/Zombie_Parrot, "The Zombie Parrot absorbs 300 damage per shot and does not degrade." So it could be just an illusion that they get killed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcodaVin3

Psittacos delenda sunt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John374622

Psittaci delendi sunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterGoess.

ceterum censeo, psittaci ebrii delendi sunt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Etymology:
Socius (lat, ally) -> Societas (lat) (partnership) -> Société (fr) (company)-> Society (en)

Socii were a tribe. I think it wasn't the tribe that gave the word, but the word that gave the name for the tribe, as it's from a PIE root.

"Socii ("allies") were the autonomous tribes and cities-states of the Italian peninsula in the permanent military alliance made with the Roman Republic until the Social War of 91-88 BC. AD"

Socii = the tribe is a permanent allies, hence the name.
Many fun for us if they had betrayed Rome.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socii


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clm2magee

Who comes up with these?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Why the "i" and the "ii" in "perfidi" and "socii" seems to have the same length? Is it me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

nimis pugnandum interficiendumque. non satis moriendum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilarymcca5

'By night' was incorrect. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela111729

Is it possible to translate "perfidii" as "evil"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schnueffi

There are so many murderers and bone-throwers in this course. Were the Ancient Romans that cruel???????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whovianhalfblood

What does killing these parrots accomish for the deceitful allies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

It stops them squawking when the deceitful allies are up to no good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ameliaelsas

I think the duolingo owl has a rivalry with the parrots.

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