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  5. "Romae studetis."

"Romae studetis."

Translation:You study in Rome.

August 29, 2019

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/human.explorer20

What would be the difference between "You study in Rome." and "You study Rome."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

In "Rōmae studētis", the word Rōma (Rome) is in the locative case, which means that something is being done in or at a place or location. For "You study Rome", you would need the accusative case, since Rōma is the direct object (the thing being studied): "Rōmam studētis".

Also keep in mind that "studētis" is used when you're talking to more than one person. If you were only talking to one person, you'd say "Rōmam studēs."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Romam studetis is wrong.

It would be "Romae": Romae studetis (dative)

Romae is both the locative, and the dative (needed with the verb "studere")

So, this one is tricky, and ambiguous, as the translation could be "You study in Rome" or "You study Rome" (as the topic of your study).

Even if the more obvious is "You study in Rome".

I reported "You study Rome" because it's not accepted yet, and it should be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charientism

And still isn't! Just when I'd started to remember that studere takes the dative! Frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

As a general rule, "studere" does not take a direct object, but a dative.

There are some examples of an accusative used with this verb, but they are either from pre-classical writers, or they are neuter pronouns, like "hoc unum/omnia haec/quod studet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

This could mean the latter, though is much more plausibly interpeted as the former.

You could instead say: "rebus romanis studetis" ("you study Roman stuff") or "urbi Romae studetis" ("you study the city of Rome").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

This sentence could be either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Rómæ studétis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jkk8043

"You study at Rome" is marked incorrect. Is there possibly a difference btw "at" and "in"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2610

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyBear08

Why is this studetis and not studes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2610

It could go either way if the prompt is "You study in Rome" since the English "you" can be singular or plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

So this literally is translated as, "You dedicate yourself in Rome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSFLAS

What case is "Romae" in here? and why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

Locative, because it's the name of a city/town.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

Other comments in this thread say that "Romae" has an ambiguous case here: yes it's probably locative (study in the city of Rome), but there's no reason it couldn't be dative (study the city of Rome as a topic). If untrue, please let us know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

Yes, there is ambiguity here. It could be either dative or locative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2610

Yes, "Romae" is both the dative and the locative form of "Roma". Apparently the course contributors didn't think of that, because the accepted answers are all "... in Rome". You can always flag "You study Rome" after it marks you wrong and select the report option "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupercus1

Hard to distinguish words in the vocals


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guignard540218

STUDETIS is a mistake. It should be STUDITIS because that verb belongs to the 4th conjugation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

No, it is correct as "studetis". It belongs to the second conjugation.

Perhaps you are misremembering due to the "i" in the noun "studium". I remember making this mistake myself once when writing a letter to Reginald Foster, who definitely let me know about it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guignard540218

Well, I just have to admit that you are right. Sorry, I have not studied Latin seriously for many years, and I was pretty sure that it was STUDIO rather than STUDEO. I should have checked before posting my remark.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanBarber

does anyone know where 'Ch-romae' is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I don't even know what "Ch-romae" is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanBarber

There is one speaker who consistently seems to pronounce Roma as 'ch-roma' and Romae as 'ch-romae' or maybe its just a fault with my headphones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tandordraco

You're probably hearing the rolled "r" being picked up poorly by a mic on the speaker's end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

I put "you study in Rome" and it was marked incorrect, presumably because I didn't have a Capital Y for you and/or missed out the full stop after Rome. This is rather petty and makes me wonder whether to continue with this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

Your answer should not have been marked wrong. That was a glitch. Duolingo typically ignores capitalization and punctuation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Maybe you made a typo. It happens a lot to everyone of us.

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