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  5. "Unde venit Corinna?"

"Unde venit Corinna?"

Translation:Where does Corinna come from?

August 29, 2019

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes, you can absolutely end a sentence with a preposition in English. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jkqxz

@Danielconcasco, technically, you're not supposed to end a sentence with a preposition, but enough people do it that is becoming more and more accepted.

As a side note, here's what Winston Churchill said about ending a sentence with a preposition: "That is the sort of English up with I will not put."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

That's not a rule in English grammar. Many people tried to force that rule from my beloved Latin onto English, but it never took because it's artificial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2607

The quote is in regards to decrees against ending sentences with prepositions (something that was never wrong to do in English, and language does not work by decree) and it actually says "This is the sort of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put."

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-cant-you-end-a-sentence-with-a-preposition

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/prepositions-ending-a-sentence-with

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/134607/history-of-the-non-rule-that-proscribes-ending-a-sentence-with-a-preposition


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h_sapiens

The preposition is not something to end a sentence with. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

That is the sort of prescriptivism wherewith we shan't put!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2607

"This is the sort of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rtcook

One CAN end a sentence with a preposition in English, but one SHOULD not do so. It is done often, but it is sloppy, just as people misuse "can vs may vs should."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandop

This was a rule imposed on English by people who thought that Latin was superior. Because you can't end a sentence with a preposition in Latin (or split an infinitive for that matter), they thought you should not do so in English, even though English has a completely different structure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Nope. It's not sloppy, nor is it wrong. It breaks no grammar rules.

Similarly, it is not wrong to use can for permission in English. These are both grammar myths often repeated with no real substance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryce639469

Why not "where is Corinna from?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Reneee

The sentence contained the verb "venit", not "est".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 177

Is this supposed to be about where she comes from (eg grew up) or where she's travelling from right now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/studygerman

Can someone please clarify?

... Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarAdal3

Is “unde” the source of “onde” in Portuguese and “donde” in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

Yes. (Interestingly, the meaning of "unde" --> "onde" shifted from "from where" to "where", so "from where" became "de onde", which became "donde", and it stayed like that in Portuguese, but in Spanish, "donde" again shifted from "from where" to just "where", so now "from where" in Spanish is "de donde". Historia se repetit.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2607

Languages do things like that all the time. The English word "children" is a good example. There is more than one plural ending there. It used to be child-childru, then after a while it followed after ox-oxen and became child-children. The French aujourd'hui (today) breaks down as "on the day of this day".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilchymis

I was expecting Ubi rather than Unde. How can I know which to use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2607

Ubi = static location
Ubi es? Where are you?

Quo = motion toward
Quo vadis? Where are you going?

Unde = motion away from
Unde venis? Where do you come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

Whence cometh Corinna?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venustheegoddess

unde is exactly the same in romanian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeremySher933665

Whence should be accepted, and "venit" could also be perfect tense so "came" should also work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

We are trying to add as many translations as possible, but we usually draw the line at archaic words.

Edit https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/whence archaic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

Honestly, "whence" did come to mind since Latin is usually a formal literary language... But I do see that the line should (but not must) be drawn somewhere. While such utterances as "Whence comes Corinna?" are correct, they are rare. . . :-s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dorti10

Where does she come from where does she go?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ratna542178

Where did you come from, oculo bombicis Joe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dankpaws

Corinna!!! Romanes Eunt Domus!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2607

"People called Romans, they go the house"?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIAdHEwiAy8


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bradleycha330981

Why doesn't 'Where did Corinna come from?' work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanFrey6

Is "Where is Corinna coming from?" an acceptable substitute?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2607

Yes, that is one of the accepted translations.

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