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  5. "Pueri sunt Romae."

"Pueri sunt Romae."

Translation:The boys are in Rome.

August 29, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chad_the_Lost

Wouldn't this translate to,"The boys are Roman"?

Where's the "in" part? I guess it's apart of Romae


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

If you want them to be "Roman" you would instead use the adjective "Romanus, Romana, Romanum."

Pueri Romani sunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenny2202

Romae is a locative which translates to "in Rome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeroNajjar

thank you I thought why don't they just use the ablative and add in, but that explains a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

The names of cities/towns and small islands, as well as 5 particular nouns, take the locative. Everything else takes in + the ablative.

https://classics.osu.edu/Undergraduate-Studies/Latin-Program/Grammar/Cases/latin-case

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlossomCoeur94

The boys are Roman = Pueri Romani sunt

It's written "Romae" because cities, towns, and small islands take the locative case, which happens to take the same endings as the genitive case. So you don't need to use "in", because the ending (and the context too) shows it's a location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

That was really helpful, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mothvision

I'm still a beginner but my understanding is that "Romae" is the locative form of "Roma". So "Roma" means "Rome", and "Romae" means "in Rome". A similar thing happens with "urbus" (city) and "urbe" (in a/the city)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

It is urbs, in the nominative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

It's "in urbe" becaue the locative only works with names of towns, cities, and small islands. "Urbs" is a common noun so it needs the preposition plus the ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woldemar_Lut

Can it mean also: ‘There are boys in Rome’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

The Latin way of expressing existence with 'sum, esse, fui" is to put the "to be" verb at the head of the sentence.

So, "There are boys in Rome" would be:

  • Sunt pueri Romae.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonGilli14

Yeah, that's how I translated it, but it didn't like it. I wonder if there's another way to express the same sentiment then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon269252

This guy's accent is really good tbh compared to the other speakers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krtzrovavrt

"The boys are in Rome" sounds a bit like a meme or something that wannabe funny youtubers would say...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke.19.10

*Thin Lizzy would like to know your location

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