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"Marcus et Stephanus iter faciunt."

Translation:Marcus and Stephanus make a journey.

August 29, 2019

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnAlienHere

Maybe it should be are on a journey instead of make a journey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMarkona

True but it is slightly improper, are on a journey would be more confusing to people who just learned the language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

There is nothing "improper" about "They are on a journey."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

True, but it sounds like it corresponds more to "In itinere sunt" than to a sentence that employs a form of facio, I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaVdro

Marcus and Livia are traveling is what I put and it was correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/firtr33

iter facere can be translated as 'to travel' iter faciunt would mean 'they travel'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouiviVeterus

I've found that 'to journey' is a good translation of 'iter facere' generally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhongsiming

Make a journey is not a very good translation. It is too literal. In English we would say take a journey or go on a trip or simply travel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Line797749

I think it is a case of using a familiar language in improper ways to show the proper way to use an unfamiliar language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Unusual" is not "improper".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charientism

Quite. I'm not sure how one would define "improper" linguistically other than "not preferred" and that's not a can of worms I would seek to open.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

My degree is in linguistics. Sounds like you ... speak my language. :-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charientism

Unless it involves an impromptu revision of an itinerary where "make" would be more elegant, at least in British usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMarkona

Yes but it is improper but you are correct it is more oftenly used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

I reported that "Marcus and Stephanus take a trip" should be accepted. To me, "make a journey" is uncommon and "take a trip" is extremely common. What about you guys?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian687890

Marcus Stephanusque iter faciunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Not all vowels in Latin are long! For example, "iter" has two short vowels, so we shouldn't be hearing "EE-ter."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

There seems to be a general problem with vowel length in the recordings for this course. It seems to me that at least one of the speakers thinks that the vowel in every stressed syllable should be long, which as you've pointed out in relation to iter is incorrect. At the same time, it is my understanding that in first declension nouns the a in the ablative singular and accusative plural endings should be long, but I don't believe I've heard it pronounced that way in any of the recordings so far. I really hope that before this course progresses beyond the beta version, a lot of the audios are re-recorded with more attention payed to correct pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ServiusSpo

Is this where the word iteration comes from by any chance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That probably comes specifically from a Latin verb iterare , to do again, renew, repeat, etc., which itself is made from the adverb iterum , again, once more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belridetulo

Anus iter facit.... (the old woman makes a journey). Just noticed how nasty Latin may sound to English speakers )))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

But there's anus, -ūs, f., old woman, and then there's ānus, -ī, m., a quite different word!! (Source of ānulus, -ī, m., ring for the finger--think about it.). And then again, there's annus, -ī, m., year. Note how the LONG vowels, and the double consonants, make a huge difference in pronunciation, and therefore on how the words come into the daughter languages. (Students in the US get admonished, from what I hear, about pronouncing the tilde in año very carefully!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flander85

Isn't "are making a journey" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

If "Marcus and Stephanus are making a journey" is marked wrong, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duckmaestro

Is 'iter' not declined?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Declension of iter (third declension, neuter):

Case Singular Plural
Nominative iter itinera
Genitive itineris itinerum
Dative itineri itineribus
Accusative iter itinera
Ablative itinere itineribus
Vocative iter itinera

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Yes, it is declined, but it is a neuter noun, and all neuter nouns have the accusative case identical to the nominative case in both singular and plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMarkona

And the vocative but that's always the same as nominative except for 2nd declention vocative singular when the nominative is ūs-that's when the voc singular becomes e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monakus

Why they don't accept "travel" instead of "journey"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barbara489190

They do. "Marcus and Stephanus travel" was accepted July 2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeOrSomething

Does "a trip" also work as iter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crystal_visions

I love the pronounciation on this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayadoMty28

Why is it wrong to use "trip" here??!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TelepinuHatti

I think that we should have the possibility to write the English version of names, at least in those with a long tradition in (at leas Medieval) Latin. For example, "Mark and Stephen travel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

No. That would take an inordinate amount of work on the part of the volunteer course contributors. They need to manually enter each possible answer to each of the question databases individually.

Besides, we are not talking about Mark and Stephen. We are talking about Marcus and Stephanus.

Translation of Names

A little convention: we will not accept translations of names as alternatives in this course. Marcus's name is Marcus, not Mark, and Stephanus is not Stephen or Steven.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Introduction/tips-and-notes

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