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  5. "I do not like rainy weather."

"I do not like rainy weather."

Translation:لا أُحِبّ اَلْطَّقْس اَلْمُمْطِر.

August 29, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julkon5

Confused a lot about definite and indefinite examples here. For me they look like a random choice from Duo side. Please help to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

if you are trying to put "a" before "rainy weather" it might be wrong (I did it before in other languages and it was marked wrong) - This is because in English the word "weather" is not counted (it does not get "A" before it, but only "the"). So, you can't say a nice weather in English, in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crossmount

would it be wrong to say لا أحِب طَقس مُمْتير


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

yeah, the definite article must be added to the noun طقس and its adjective ممطر


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crossmount

thank you for that and correcting my spelling mistake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eshbay

But why? I see everywhere the the the...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julkon5

Ok..., i was just awaiting definite article in the English sentence in this very case. Do I understand correctly that in Arabic the weather is always with definite article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

Not necessarily.
However, in such instances where in English they speak of "general" item which does not require a definite or indefinite article (like the example above, rainy weather), in Arabic, such example is not followed and mostly the word would come defined EVEN if it is a general aspect. Like, my classical example of such aspect, I love nature. Nature here points to the general aspect of "nature" - However in Arabic, the typical translation would be أحب الطبيعة and not أحب طبيعة; it would be meaningless to leave طبيعة without the definite article AL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulol14

TJ_Q8, thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

but doesn't this sentence mean, "I do not like THE rainy weather"?? If not, then I haven't understood up til now, because I thought the alif-lam turned it from indefinite into definite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

The answer is just above your question, but I will copy it again for you here:

Not necessarily.
However, in such instances where in English they speak of "general" item which does not require a definite or indefinite article (like the example above, rainy weather), in Arabic, such example is not followed and mostly the word would come defined EVEN if it is a general aspect. Like, my classical example of such aspect, I love nature. Nature here points to the general aspect of "nature" - However in Arabic, the typical translation would be أحب الطبيعة and not أحب طبيعة; it would be meaningless to leave طبيعة without the definite article AL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

thank you, TJ, but I'm still confused. If you were to say, "I do not like the rainy weather," how would the sentence be different in Arabic then? or would it??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

Well, in these instances (and generally really) you would be advised to look at the "essence" of the meaning and translate according to that. And yes, the definite article between Arabic and English (and other languages of course) do have a change in meaning like we do here.
Now, if the sentence in English here originally has (the) in it: I do not like THE rainy weather, even though that English is not my first language but when I say such a sentence I do personally feel it is a "dedicated" sentence rather than a general one. Like if, for example, you are talking about the rainy weather in some spot in the world and you are saying that you don't like THE rainy weather, there. Meanwhile, weather is not a counted entity so it does not come with (a) when indefinite, so probably it makes sense in English to state such general statements about "not liking the weather" in an indefinite form - maybe? This is how I feel it does.
Moving to Arabic, if we talking about a general aspect, then the noun must be definite (with AL of course); Period. If not, AL is not added. If it is about some specific weather in some place, additional words are added to point that, like hunák هناك (there), for example.
So, in a nutshell, it is about the essence and what do you have in mind. Are you saying I don't like THE rainy weather and having in mind a general idea? Then translating that in Arabic, it should come with AL (defined noun). Are you speaking about the rainy weather in some place? Then, well, you can add AL in Arabic again with some extra words as guidance. In fact when I come to think about it now, I tried removing the AL from the sentence and to me it didn't make sense at all in Arabic; I can't even imagine a context for it in my humble imagination.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnjAy400482

I'll try to ask the question that others seem to be asking:

In English, if we say "I like the hot weather", it means that we are referring to the weather specific to now or specific to the conversation we're having now (Do you like Brazil? Yes, I like the hot weather [there]. )

If we say I like hot weather, it means we generally prefer warm temperatures over cold ones.

The question is, in Arabic, can you ever say "I like THE hot weather (that we've been having recently, of Saudi Arabia, etc)" in a way that is distinguishable from "I like hot weather (in general)"?

Would you have to say something like "I like THIS/THAT hot weather (we've had recently, of Brazil, etc)"? Or is it just based on context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

For general sense, as in English I like hot weather - in Arabic you would say أحب الطقس الحار or أحب الجو الحار - as can be seen, the definite article AL here is used in Arabic unlike the English counterpart.
For a specific hot weather .... in some specific place .. you would most likely specify that by "there" هناك or mentioning the place name for example. Saying that sentence in Arabic without any definite article like أحب طقساً حاراً doesn't really make sense (unless there is some ... unusual context around it that justifies the usage of the indefinite case).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kobold83015

unusual context.. imagine you control the weather systems of several planets of a galactic empire. And want to say "I don't like a bad weather (on any of the planets concerned).

.. or, other example, more down to earth: your company owns several agricultural fields in different climatic zones on the earth. and you want to express "I don't like a bad weather (on any of my fields)!"

would such circumstances allow that sentence without articles Al before weather and adverb? Very constructed situations, I admit. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Away54

لَا أُحِبُّ الطَّقْسَ الْمُمْطِرَ.

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