"The orator sends me a letter."

Translation:Orator ad me litteras mittit.

August 29, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Why not orator litteras ad me mittit also?

Reported.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rory_OConor

as above

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouiviVeterus

Shouldn't 'mihi' also be accepted as opposed to 'ad me'?

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

I would have thought so. French uses a remnant of the dative case 3rd person singular pronoun in 'lui envoyer une lettre" (send him/her a letter.) It would make sense if that came from Latin. However, it doesn't seem to. I can't find anything in my Latin dictionary under 'mitto' besides constructions with 'ad + pronoun/noun/name." Maybe someone else knows more?

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouiviVeterus

Thanks.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teacon7

Maybe I'm not understanding this... why couldn't the dative "mihi" work here?

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

It seems it is just not how Romans talked about sending letters. They used the construction ‘litteras/epistulam ad [name/pronoun in accusative] mittere’.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

Isn't ''litteras'' accusative plural? How does that translate into ''a letter''.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

Romans thought of all the individual letters that go into writing what, in English, we call ‘a letter.’ They might ask us, “Why do you call it ‘a letter’ when you use so many letters to make it?” :) They also used the singular ‘epistula’.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

The singular "litteram" would mean a single letter of the alphabet, rather than a missive.

September 17, 2019
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