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  5. "Haec est mustela mea."

"Haec est mustela mea."

Translation:This is my weasel.

August 29, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidZeev

There are many like it, but this one is mine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

And is weasily distinguished from a Stoat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean52990

Of course it is easily distinguished because a stoat is stotally different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

septimana totia adsum...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cambarellus

Is this a Latin pickup line?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordFinchley

And she sleeps with me in the bedroom away from our drunk parrot who throws fishes on the floor. We Romans live a charmed life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik965703

Until the drunk parrot destroys the villa (by chance!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Hic est canis meus.

Haec est mustela mea.

Hic est sagitta mea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Haec sagitta, indubitābiliter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hegr
  • 430

[Points to husband.]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllenGreen4

exactly! only thing that makes sense!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

Curiosity question: Did the Romans really have weasels to catch mice/rats?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlatheaAnd

Apparently Greek and Roman authors referred to weasels living in houses, which some people have taken to mean that they were either kept as pets or at least kept deliberately to keep down rats and mice: but they may just have been considered as pests themselves. https://foundinantiquity.com/2013/10/28/the-weasel-in-antiquity-pet-or-pest/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean52990

Thank you for sharing this fascinating article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blueberry463923

Também tenho esta dúvida.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hobbit22.9

This explains the weasels in the bedroom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Pop!! Where have you been?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Like in the TV: Mustela sum!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

I keep flashing back to Frank Zappa's 1970 'Weasels Ripped My Flesh' album...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChippersMom

never having seen this one before, I heard "high test stella Mare"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilCross2

Dear God, I love this Latin course. If ever I happen to be transported back in time to Ancient Rome, I will know so many useful phrases!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexterAndre

I'm waiting for an "I R weasel" joke just about now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nnullness

How do you say "that is my weasel?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Illa est mustela mea."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlatheaAnd

Not to be confused with Woman holding Ferret, by Leonard of Quirm...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fringillus

Say hello to my little friend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

One of the reasons I want to learn Latin is because scientific names are sometimes based on it. Weasels belong to the genus Mustela.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

...my cunning plan, on which I put a tail...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IHAVEGIVENUP

Charlie Bailygates speaks Latin!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamillaCSN

This weasel is mine should be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franz460815

Wouldn't that rather be "haec mustela mea est"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean52990

I think that both options are correct but yours is the one that is more commonly used as it places the verb at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I think I heard somewhere that in Latin the verb "to be" differs from other verbs in that it isn't put at the end so much. I could be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schrodinger95

"This weasel is mine" was wrong. How do you say mine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Mine" would also be "meus/mae/meum." For your sentence, "haec" and "mustela" would normally be placed next to each other: "Haec mustela est mea" or "Haec mustela mea est."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DariaWaugh

nemo mustela mea sacrificare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavetheDuodemon.

Did the Romans keep many weasels? Does it mean ferrets?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

what if it is a male weasel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

That doesn't matter. The word "mustela" is feminine gender, and it's used to refer to any weasel of either sex; "mustela mea" is not necessarily a female weasel. Some animals do have a separate masculine and feminine word, but for the most part animals names have a single name with a particular gender, and that word is used regardless of the animal's actual sex.

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