1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Me bene habeo."

"Me bene habeo."

Translation:I am well.

August 29, 2019

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Werewolf529883

Is h in habeo silent or not? Anybody knows? The lady doesn't pronounce it, but the man does. I am confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delaney685328

Its not silent. I think they have really bad pronouncers half the time i cant understand what the people are saying or their saying it wrong. I have taken Latin 1 and am now taking Latin 2 and we dont pronounce some of the words the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dc108
  • 2158

Thanks for this link on Latin consonant pronunciations, Rae!
Also by the same guy on vowels: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwtgvwJljto
And his yt.com channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrMiGmO4X9WeWq1fMm_7avg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilchymis

from what little I do know the h is not silent but it soft, like a pronounced exhale of sorts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awawe1

There are many latin pronunciations used today, with the most popular being Ecclesiastical (the pronunciation used in the catholic church, which is based on modern Italian phonology) and Classical (the reconstructed pronunciation of Latin from around the birth of Christ). Both are valid, but they have some differences; one of which being that the H is pronounced in Classical Latin, but not in Ecclesiastical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delaney685328

My latin class says : Sum bene. Which translates to I am well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaron283736

Yeah im a little confused by this actually habeo doesnt really fit there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, Rae. But it's a Duolingo source. Could someone paste other sources for this expression, just to check.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Tacitus, Annals 14.51 has Burrus say "Ego me bene habeo".

Cicero in letter 2.8 to Atticus says "bene habemus nos", which can be translated as "We are in a good way".

There may be other classical sources, but I only found these two via a Google search.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itlva

Why is it "Me" and not "Ego sum"? and why is "habeo" needed? Can't I just say "Ego sum bene"? Doesn't "bene" itself mean "well"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

"Habere" is literally "to have/to hold". Therefore the reflexive pronoun is required for it to say "I hold myself well".

We use "well" in English as a health-related adjective (I am well), but outside of that context it is an adverb. "Bene" is typically an adverb and we cannot assume that Latin uses adverbs in the complement to describe the subject (?Ego sum bene).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandBas1

i am well or i feel weel??? is it not the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

So is it correct to inject the adverb in the middle between the reflexive pronoun and the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

From http://rharriso.sites.truman.edu/latin-language/latin-word-order/,

Adverbs do not have endings to indicate agreement, so they are “velcroed” to the word they modify, usually coming directly before.

From that, I would think that it is correct to inject the adverb between the reflexive pronoun and the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickBell12

Is this talking about health or mood? Good and well are different in this context. Can bene be used for both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venustheegoddess

As a Romanian speaker, translating this literally would refer to your health.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/turknew

Can i just say habeo bene? I feel well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

You can't.
Habeo is not "I feel", it's "I have/hold".
Habeo=I have/hold
Me habeo=I have/hold myself
In addition, the non-copulative verb usually should be at the end of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

No. "Habere" means "to hold". It needs to be reflexive: "I have myself well." It's not "I hold well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilchymis

Doesn't this translate as I have the 'Good' or is that too literal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

The "me" is accusative: literally, "I have/hold myself well". Bene is an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Payson372807

...Et sciam ut habeam nunc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michle612268

"Me bene habeo" = I am well. OK. But when I translate "male me habeo" as "I am bad", the answer is wrong and it is "I feel poorly". Could someone explain to me ? Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

I am well = my health is good.

I am good = I am a good person.

I am bad = I am a bad person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Payson372807

'Me bene habeo' literally means 'I hold myself well', which we translate as "I feel good'. You can almost think of this as the answer to the question "how are you holding up?". "Me male have", "I hold myself badly", just means the opposite of "me bene habeo", and we have to translate it to something with an opposite meaning. "I feel poorly'" is just one possiby translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

But, Michle, you can say "I feel bad" when you don't feel well physically or emotionally.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/do-you-feel-bad-or-feel-badly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michle612268

Thank you for your reply. It's not very easy to learn Latin through English, I'm French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.A.M.C0

I wrote "I feel great" but got Marc-ed wrong (by the way, stop using Marcus). Can someone explain why?? Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

"Great" is too strong a term here, Stephane.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Mé bene habeó.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

"Great" is too strong to be an accurate translation. "I feel good" or "I feel fine" would be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CourtneyWi847639

Why is it sometimes thw who before the feeling bu other times its "feeling, who, form of habet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

Latin syntax is relatively flexible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DjaildoQuaresma

Is the pronunciation of 'habeo' hAbeo ou habEo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1189

It's habeo, not habeo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

And of course my mind goes directly to "It's leviosa, not leviosar."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curious_Soul

Is "Me habeo bene" also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

No. Adverbs come before verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609
  1. "I am" is "sum", not "sums".
  2. You cannot have more than one conjugated verb in the same phrase. You would not say "He is has".
  3. Latin does not say "I am have" or use "esse" to help conjugate verbs.
  4. "Se habere" literally means "to have oneself".

(ego) me bene habeo


Here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaloghTams19

It sounds "mi", not "me", like in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

Why isn it me(acc.) Rather than ego (nom.) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2609

As explained on this page before, it's literally "I hold myself well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balthazariusness

If they translated "habeo" to "i have" does it make sense that this can be literally translated to "i have a feeling of wellness" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaGuill1

The voice says "mei" , not "me". That's not right, is it? Sounds like English pronunciation slipping in.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.