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  5. "Quaeso, da mihi triginta cru…

"Quaeso, da mihi triginta crustula."

Translation:Please give me thirty cookies.

August 29, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The9

Crustulum monstrum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Wow, thanks for that link. I am now an official Jocelyn fan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McDeeh

Hey, shouldn't it be ['kwaiso], not ['kwaizo]?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonGunnarsson

Yes. [z] doesn't exist in Classical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rose528361

Didn't zeta exists in Cl?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicholas141873

Should I report the s in Quaeso sounding like a z or is there some pronunciation rule I don't know about that does that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

(Wiktionary) Classical Latin is /ˈkʷae̯.soː/, yes, not /z/, report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reimersholme71

I've noticed this new speaker in the app the past few weeks. There are more details in the pronunciation that are not classical in that voice. Very "American " R and L, diphthong sounds on single vowels (as in American English, not classical Latin) for example.

Maybe DuoLingo needs more voice volunteers? Should we ask them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ealdhelm

The letter s in the word quaeso should not in classical Latin pronunciation be voiced (made to sound like) /z/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayOguns

The pronunciation of 'triginta' by the voice is confusing. I typed what I heard...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pitaahio

Is there a relation between quaeso and Portuguese quase / French quasi / Spanish casi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahau.3

Quaeso is related to quaero (Sp quiero= I want), and quasi comes from quam (Sp como= as)+sī (Sp si= if).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

DL Latin has done a good job in asking a deferential request in this fashion using the imperative with quaeso. If you leave out quaeso, it's an order one could make of a slave, as is the case in Petronius, Satyricon, 55: Da nobis vina Falerna, puer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlackN_nja12

Quaeso, da mihi quinque crustula et vinum rubrum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samuel455686

should "Please give me thirty biscuits" be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. Report it if it's not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Accepted March 2021


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

No, these are cookies, not biscuits. :-(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard847274

I believe crustulum is actually anything baked such as cake, bread or biscuits. Biscuits was accepted for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

That which Americans call "cookie" is called "biscuit" in many other parts of the English-speaking world


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

"Queso, da mihi XXX crustula" was not accepted. Reported 30-09-19.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

No. This course is not teaching Roman numerals. This course is teaching words. Using Roman numerals defeats the purpose of learning that "thirty" is "triginta".

If you were translating into English, however, then 30 would be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I do agree. No Duolingo course accept numerals (30) or abbreviation (&) when we are here to learn words. We have to type the word "triginta", not using abbreviations or figures. They have this course in every course, and I think it's a good one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jarvis755634

A quo est iste puer ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tacotank10

Can someone explain the verb da here? What is the infinitive form? I assume it's taking a special form since it's a command given to a second person or something. So far everything we have learned that second person singular ends with an s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

That'll be CXX coins, thanks...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai247906

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