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  5. "How are you doing, Marcus?"

"How are you doing, Marcus?"

Translation:Quomodo te habes, Marce?

August 29, 2019

141 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Purplesmoothie

Why is it Mar"ce" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It puts Marcus into the vocative case, which is used when addressing someone. Since we are asking Marcus how he is doing, we are addressing him.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmorre2

Thanks for that. It really helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElNisimSnow

But how do I know when to use vocative. "Marcus" is the only name i've seen with it. Livia, Corinna and Stephanus don't use the final "ce". Please help me with this one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's not "ce" that's the suffix. The root of Marc-us is Marc. Marc-us and Stephan-us are the same declension, so their vocatives are Marc-e and Stephan-e.

Livia and Corinna are a different declension where the vocative does not look different from the nominative.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlotteN7

I can't click on your links. Anyone else having this problem? Otherwise an amazing initiative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Thank you. People do occasionally say the links don't work for them, but every time I test them they work fine for me. All I can do is re-post them unformatted. Sometimes that works.

A plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33822673?comment_id=34261475

The noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_1_4.jpg
declensions 4&5: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_2_5.jpg

The verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-1st.png
2nd Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-2nd.png
3rd Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-3rd.png
3rd i-stem Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-3rd-i-stem.png
4th Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-4th.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It depends on the declension the noun belongs to.

Since Stephanus and Marcus are 2nd declension and end in -us in the nominative singular, they take the ending -e in the vocative singular.

All other declensions and the plural of 2nd declension -us have a vocative that is the same as the nominative. That is why Livia and Corinna are not different when they are in the vocative (they are 1st declension nouns).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnssiAatam

This vocative form with its declensions baffles me. How can I know which person names belong to what declension?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Same as you would determine any other nouns. Most dictionaries give an entry for a word with the nominative and genitive singular which you can usually determine the declension with by looking at the genitive.

If the genitive ends in:

  • -ae - 1st declension. The vocative is the same as the nominative. Livia, Corinna, and Minerva are all 1st declension.

  • -i - 2nd declension. The vocative is the same as the nominative when it ends in -um or -r e.g. puer, vir. The vocative is -e if the nominative ends in -us e.g. Marcus, Stephanus, and Bacchus. The vocative is -i if it is filius or a name that ends in -ius e.g. * Iulius becomes Iuli*.

  • -is - 3rd declension. The vocative is the same as the nominative e.g. Mars (gen. Martis) and Iuppiter (gen. Iovis).

  • -us - 4th declension. The vocative is the same as the nominative. Not really introduced in the course currently.

  • -ei (with a nominative ending in -es) - 5th declension. The vocative is the same as the nominative e.g. dies and meridies.

If you have access to the course 'Tips' (only seems to be when using the web browser version for me), they may explain it as well. Rae.F has also commented on this page links to explanations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

Is the "te" necessary? I thought pronouns can be dropped if the verb makes it clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThemistoclesL

It is necessary here. Without 'te', the sentence would mean "How do you have, Marcus?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom_greyblue

So instead it is something like, "How do you have yourself, Marcus?" Sorry, just trying to get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes, that is a very literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Only subject pronouns can be dropped. "Se" is the (reflexive) object pronoun. It cannot be dropped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

I know! If Rae weren't so generous and helpful, she would be intolerable. (This is entirely a joke.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barisaabir

Ok. Marce??? So is every name converted in Latin? Or just some? Why cant i just use his name as its written?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraKate

When addressing people in Latin, you use the vocative case. In general, the vocative is the same as the nominative (or subject) form. So if you wanted to say, "Livia, do you like ice cream?" the correct form would be Livia. But for personal names that end in -us (which is most masculine names), the correct vocative form is -e (so Marce in the example above); and for personal names that end in -ius, the correct vocative form is -i.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Kate is absolutely correct; I am making a more general point here.

Latin, rather than using a lot of prepositions, articles, etc., usually changes the root word to indicate whether a noun is the subject, object, tense, possessive, vocative, singular v. plural, etc. We are used to conjugating verbs in English; in Latin nouns and adjectives change in a similar manner. (It isn't called "conjugation" when the word is a noun, but it is even more variable.)

This is why word order isn't as important in Latin as it is in English. You can change the meaning of an entire English sentence by adding a comma. Not so much in Latin.

I think DL could do a better job of explaining this at the outset of the course.


[deactivated user]

    One thing that wasn't explained to you by the other comments is that Marcus is actually a Latin name, and English borrowed it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

    Not in the other comments, but in the course itself there is a note somewhere in the early skills that explains how Marcus and Stephanus will be used in their Latin forms and NOT translated into "Mark" or "Steven" or equivalents in other languages. The reason is precisely because Latin names are declined just as other nouns are. Translating Marcus into "Mark" would defeat that purpose.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD

    I thought word order didn't matter as long as everything was in its proper case? Why does it have to be "...te habes..." and can't be "... habes te..." ? Just curious.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraKate

    Word order does matter in the sense that there are common expectations for how classical Latin is written. It is most common for objects to precede subjects, for instance, thus "te habes." Authors can play around with this to some extent, but to say that Latin word order doesn't matter is a misrepresentation of how it was actually used in written prose.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Exactly. 99% of the time when people say that a language has "free" word order, what they really mean is that is has somewhat flexible word order. But there are rules and it's not a free-for-all. Otherwise, linguists would not have been able to categorize Latin as an SOV language.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

    Here you are again, Rae, blazing a trail for those of us who aren't as clever! It's nice to see a friendly "face" as I begin a new language. I had to look up "SOV language", but, yeah, that's how I recall it from a year of college Latin 50 years ago: verbs tend to go last in Latin sentences.

    ETA I meant "new language" here at DL. I don't really remember much from taking Latin as a college freshman--except I really enjoyed the literature.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henrice1

    Wouldn't the correct word order be "Quomodo Marce te habes?" The verb goes last in classical Latin if I remember correctly and it doesnt make much sense to me to have "te" before Marce seeing as it is paired with "habes" in the translation, not Marce necessarily. I think Duolingo just told me the correct word order would have the verb in the middle so that, when translated, the words made sense in the English sentence structure, even though I am fairly certain that is technically incorrect. Was I right or at least closer to right than Duolingo?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraKate

    In this instance, because Marce is a vocative, it is usually separate from the main SOV of the sentence, as it is not grammatically relevant, only situationally relevant. Quomodo te habes? is a complete idea without the addition of someone's personal name--that just comes as a bonus form of address.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

    Just as it is improper to say in English, "Blue is beautiful the sky," or "Blue sky the beautiful is," and convey your meaning that you find the blue sky beautiful, so it is in Latin. Some words MUST be linked in a certain order, but where those linked words appear in the sentence--for the most part--is flexible.

    So, to continue the analogy, you can say, "Beautiful is the blue sky," and, "The blue sky is beautiful," and still properly convey your meaning. But blue and sky MUST be linked together in the proper order.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phoenix_Blythes

    What is the difference between quid agis and quomodo te habes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Colloquially, they both translate as "How are you doing?"

    Literally, "Quid agis?" is "What are you doing?" and "Quomodo te habes?" is "How do you keep yourself?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alain542030

    nonne "quid agis, Marce" aut " ut vales, Marce" recte sunt?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom_greyblue

    What does Quomodo literally mean? Im having trouble Englishing it for myself, as well as "agit"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

    quomodo means 'in what way' or 'how'.

    Quomodo te habes? is quite literally "How do you have yourself?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

    Quōmodo tū tē habēs, Mārce?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

    quid agit, Marce? = Quomodo te habes, Marce? ?¿


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Quid agis, Marce?

    But roughly yes. It literally means "What are you doing?" but apparently it can be used idiomatically to inquire into someone's well-being.

    Quomodo te habes, Marce? literally means "How do you hold/have yourself?" and its relationship to the concept of "How are you/How are you doing?" is a little more transparent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malika40508

    The meaning of habeo,-ere in the reflexive form literally means be so situated or be in a way (from entry #21 on habeo,-ere in OLD). It is a very versatile verb in Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

    thank you

    nota bene: quid agiS. Ok :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Yes, because you are directly talking to Marcus (hence the vocative Marce).

    pronoun verb suffix
    ego -o
    tu -s
    id -t
    nos -mus
    vos -tis
    ea -nt

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

    Why is when you go back and read the notes everything is perfectly understandable but then I get here and have no idea what I am doing. How do we know when to use "te" or "se" or when not to? And doing and feeling are the same verb? I'm very confused about the word order. I wish we could know which one was the best one to use. I seem to get some of them right no matter what order I put them in but I don't really know what I am saying in Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    "Doing" and "feeling" are not the same verb.

    Just as in English, we can say "How are you doing?" idiomatically to mean "How are you feeling?", in Latin "How do you hold yourself?" is how they idiomatically say "How are you feeling?"

    That's what the "te" is doing here. It's a reflexive pronoun.

    Word order in Latin is reasonable flexible. Calling it "free" word order is misleading. The general tendency is toward Subject Object Verb, but that's not super rigid. Stative verbs like "essere/to be" don't take objects but rather complements, and the general tendency in those sentences is toward Subject Verb Complement.

    But that's statements. With questions, the verb tends to show up much earlier in the sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

    Becky, I too am having some trouble with the Latin program--even though I've been using the Spanish program every day for years. I think we have to remember it's a beta program and they are still working on it. Myself, I'd like to cover one declension thoroughly before I jump to the next.

    I bought Henley's LATIN I and LATIN GRAMMAR to help. You may be able to acquire both for use on a Kindle or on a Kindle app on your computer.

    Unlike DL, they give you declensions and conjugations in complete charts to which one can refer with a glance.

    Also, Rae is a fantastic resource! But I try to do at least some of my own research before shifting the burden to her. She's not on salary, after all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crt-z

    Would "Quomodo agis, Marce?" be correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

    That would be "quid agis".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxlev10

    Why isn't it correct to say "quid te habesz, marce"? Aren't quomodo and quid interchangable synonyms?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    No. "Quid" is "what" and "quomodo" is "how".

    Quid agis; quomodo te habes.
    What are you doing; how do you hold yourself.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jania0622

    correction: quid agis means how are you?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    It's used to mean "How are you?" But I gave the literal translations to show how the vocabulary works, to demonstrate that you can't just interchange "quomodo" and "quid".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

    They gave a more literal translation. But yes, it can be used to mean "How are you?"


    [deactivated user]

      And by literal, they mean unidiomatic calque from the English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      How is either Quid agis? or Quomodo te habes? a calque from English?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura596127

      Marcus or Marce? Sometimes the correct translation is Marcus and other is Marce. How to know which is the correct form of the name for each case?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henrice1

      Marcus is for when Marcus is just the subject of the sentence. When Marcus is a noun of direct address, it becomes Marce and takes the vocative case. I don't remember all of the rules for vocative case, but there is a way for every name to be made into a noun of direct address. For an example of direct address: in the sentence "Marcus, do you live in New York?" Marcus would become Marce because I am addressing him directly. When Marcus is just the subject of the sentence (such as "Marcus eats the cookie") it will remain as Marcus. I believe this is correct; if not please correct me! If you would like more immediate confirmation, you can look up "vocative case in Latin" you'll probably be able to find all of the rules and examples:)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Henrice1 is correct.

      "Marce" is the vocative case and only used when you are speaking directly to Marcus. Quid agis, Marce? How are you doing, Marcus?

      "Marcus" is the nominative and is primarily used when Marcus is the subject of the sentence. Quid agit Marcus? How is Marcus doing?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Forgive me, but Henrice1 is partially correct. Only masculine names change in the vocative case. Feminine names stay the same. So Marcus becomes Marce when you are addressing him, but Corinna remains Corinna.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Good point. I only addressed the superficial question as it pertained to the name Marcus. I didn't explore deeper into the vocative in other situations.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

      Quid agit, Marce = Quomodo te habes, Marce ?¿ ?¿


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Quid agis, Marce? ~~ Quomodo te habes, Marce?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimMiller826904

      It marked me wrong because i didn't translate the name. It should still be correct of all of the other words are right.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      No, you're not supposed to translate the name. However, you do need to decline it appropriately if you're answering in Latin. Since we are addressing Marcus directly, the name needs to be in the vocative case: "Quomodo te habes, Marce?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Ditto. What Rae said.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julua255390

      What is difference between "habeo" and "habes?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      1st person singular vs 2nd person singular.

      http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habere

      English Latin
      I have habeo
      you have habes
      he/she/it has habet
      we have habemus
      y'all have habetis
      they have habent

      With regular verbs (which most of them are) you can see the stem and the suffix:

      habe-o
      habe-s
      habe-t
      habe-mus
      habe-tis
      habe-nt


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      I read in a Latin instruction text that students teach themselves the regular verb endings by singing them to the "Mickey Mouse" song.

      So instead of "M I C--K E Y--M O U S E"

      They sing "O S T--M U S--T I S N T"

      I thought it was the stupidest thing I'd ever heard, but I haven't forgotten the endings since I read about the mnemonic and sang the ditty in my head.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      The mnemonic I made for myself is OST (Original Sound Track) Must, Isn't. I know the last bit smooshes them together, but I know where the divisions are (having studied a few Romance languages helps) so it works for me. And at this point I don't even need it so much anymore.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      I like it BECAUSE I study other Romance languages. Helps me to not confuse the endings with those of Spanish and French. LOL.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asae20

      I keep mixing quomodo and quid agit, I put "Quid agit Marce", what's the difference? How do I stop making that mistake?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Colloquially, "Quomodo te habes, Marce?" and "Quid agis, Marce?" both translate as "How are you doing, Marcus?"

      "Quomodo te habes, Marce?" is literally "How do you hold yourself, Marcus?"
      "Quid agis, Marce?" is literally "What are you doing, Marcus?"

      It looks like your issue is you're using the wrong verb conjugation.

      "Quomodo se habet Marcus?" and "Quid agit Marcus?" are asking someone else how Marcus is doing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astegal

      Thanks man, had troubles figuring this one out.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElanaDewey

      Thank you for helping understand this:. Why is the name Marcus spelled two different ways?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      "Marcus" follows the second declension. Like all nouns, it takes different endings for the different cases.

      Here is this plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
      Latin cases, in English

      Here are also these declension charts:
      declensions 1-3
      declensions 4&5

      Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

      Here are these conjugation charts:
      Latin verb forms


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolineDu726623

      It says that "are you doing" is facitis.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      That's just the raw, out of context, literal translation of the English.

      For the greeting, which in idiomatic English is "How are you doing?", you have two options:

      Quid agis (literally) What are you doing
      https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/quid_agis

      Quomodo te habes (literally) What are you doing; how do you hold yourself


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikita195683

      Should "Quomodo se habet, Marce?" be accepted? I gave this answer and duo told me it's just a typo, but it's not (i totally meant to write it), and i feel like i wrote some gibberish


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      The correction algorithm (which is programmed by the site devs, so the course contributors have no control over it) allows for one wrong letter per word to qualify it as a typo instead of an error.

      If you are addressing Marcus directly, it needs to be the second person (with vocative)
      Quomodo te habes, Marce?

      If you are inquiring about Marcus to someone else, then it's the third person (with nominative)
      Quomodo se habet Marcus?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      It shouldn't be.

      I suspect what you have there would be more like: "How is he/she doing, Marcus?"

      It is a question directed at Marcus but about someone else since se habet is third person singular instead of second person singular (te habes).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamillaCSN

      Why only the name Marcus changes?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      It isn't only Marcus, Stephanus changes as well. What does NOT change are names with a feminine ending such as Livia.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fhilhamdhi

      what is the difference between "habes" and "habet"?

      thanks in advance


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habere

      As explained elsewhere on this page:

      If you are addressing Marcus directly, it needs to be the second person (with vocative)
      Quomodo te habes, Marce?
      How are you doing, Marcus?

      If you are inquiring about Marcus to someone else, then it's the third person (with nominative)
      Quomodo se habet Marcus?
      How is Marcus doing?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlejandroBengoa

      Your explanation sounds quite logical


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Habes = You (singular) have

      Habet = S/he has


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      tu -> nominative, the subject of the sentence (tu habes - 'you have')

      te -> can be accusative or ablative. As the accusative it is the direct object of the sentence (tu te habes - literally 'you have yourself', ego te habeo - 'I have you')

      The difference is similar to the difference in forms for some of the English pronouns. I and me, he and him, she and her, we and us, they and them.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTCarey

      but you say in th intro that all names had to be written as they were given


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      English does not decline nouns. "Marcus" is always "Marcus" in English because that's his name. Latin declines nouns. Names are nouns, so "Marcus" will decline appropriately in Latin.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Rae is right (as always). What you read merely said that DL won't accept Anglicized versions of names, such as Mark for Marcus and Steven for Stephanus. The reason for this is that we have to get used to declining names in Latin and we can't do that with the English versions of names.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlejandroBengoa

      There wasn't any sound in the 'Leave a comment' section


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      This is true throughout the Latin module. It's still in beta testing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SongPlayz

      Why is this correct instead of Quomodo tu te habes, Marcus?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      You need the vocative Marce since you're addressing him directly.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suqqus

      Thanks for answering my question, comments people! :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spanish424676

      Why was quomodo te agis Marce not accepted


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      If you want to use "agere", you need to say "Quid agis, Marce?" What you said was something like "How do you do yourself?"

      "Quomodo te habes" is literally "How do you hold yourself".
      "Quid agis" is literally "What are you doing".

      But the Romans used them idiomatically, so they get translated into the corresponding "How are you doing", which is also a little idiomatic. We just take it for granted because that's just how we say it in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas199862

      The same question was asked before but with Stephanus and I used "Stephane" but it was wrong there


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akifbulut

      once i translated marcus as marce and system accepted it wrong and now it's accepting it wrong because i didn't translate it as marce


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      You need to use the right case. Marcus is nominative and Marce is vocative.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayenji

      Why is "Quomodo tu te habes, Marcus" wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      You're addressing him directly, so you need to vocative case: Quomodo te habes, Marce?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seppo_koo

      Why is 'quomodo Marce te habes' not correct, when 'quomodo femina se habet' is?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      It's the difference between addressing a person directly and asking about someone else. I don't think they said "How Marcus are you doing?" That's not the same as "How is the woman doing?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarieCurie939565

      Quodo te habes, Marce? . . . I think of it as, 'How are you holding (up) Marcus? It's not an exact translation, but it helps me to remember to use the verb 'to have,' . . . as in to have and to hold. In English we use this when someone is going through something difficult. So, it's not the same as just asking how someone is doing, but I find the mnemonic useful.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      "Quomodo te habes, Marce?" is literally "How do you hold yourself?" or "How do you keep yourself?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      With Rae's correction, I think that's a good idea, Marie. I'm going to use "holding up" as a reminder myself.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Volkvich

      When to say "se" and when to say "te"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      se is the third person reflexive and is used when the subject is someone we are talking about who is not the speaker or the listener.

      'How is Marcus doing?' (When we are asking someone else about Marcus) -> Quomodo Marcus se habet?

      te is the second person singular form and is used when the listener (the person we are taking to) is being referred to.

      'How are you doing Marcus?' (We are asking Marcus directly) -> Quomodo te habes, Marce?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManarAlsha

      Why not quomodo tu te habes marce


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Latin rarely used the subject pronoun, and the te and the habes makes it quite clear.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlotte172200

      Why does it say 'tu te habes' is wrong in this case?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      What was your full sentence? I am pretty there is a similar question and answer in this discussion elsewhere.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlotte172200

      Quomodo te habes, Marce? - i thought it might be because there is already Marcus mentioned. But i am not sure. I read 'Quomodo tu te habes?' in other examples


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      I suspect that it would be a little much to have the tu when we are using Marce. Just by using Marce, te, and the ending on habes makes it abundantly clear that the subject is second person singular. Not sure if using tu would be incorrect, but would be very redundant.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soeren326553

      Ok, so i wrote quomodo habete te marce and was checked as correct , and now I'm confused...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Yeah, that's a pretty bad glitch. Next time something like that happens, flag it before you move on and report "My answer should not have been accepted."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soeren326553

      I don't have enough confidence in my latin yet to actually correct duolingo :) But next time I stumble over it I will report it


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      "Te" is the 2nd person singular direct object pronoun and "habete" is the 2nd person plural imperative verb conjugation. Since you're only addressing Marcus and asking him a question, it should be "Quomodo te habes, Marce?" with the 2nd person singular indicative. You also need the object to be before the verb, not after.

      http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habere


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Latin is still in the Beta-test version, isn't it Madam Moderator? As such, this is the very BEST time to report problems or errors.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanjay75888

      DL should first teach why marcus is not accepted and only then we can move forward. Or DL can remove marcus and replace with other name


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      The first two lessons touch upon this:
      https://preview.duolingo.com/skill/la/Introduction/tips-and-notes
      https://preview.duolingo.com/skill/la/Greetings/tips-and-notes

      "Marcus" is the nominative, used for the subject or subject complement.
      "Marce" is the vocative, used for direct address. You can think of it as like an interjection. It's not technically part of the rest of the sentence but sort of sits just outside of it.

      Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
      Latin cases, in English

      Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
      declensions 1-3
      declensions 4&5

      Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

      For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
      1st Conjugation
      2nd Conjugation
      3rd Conjugation
      3rd i-stem Conjugation
      4th Conjugation


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lukas373331

      why cant i say "agis"? isnt it basically the same thing?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JkumC5vF

      It is. Quomodo te habes, quomodo vales, quomodo agis, quomodo contendis vitam tuam, are all valid translations. But Duolingo's knowledge of latin is far below an average italian high school student's.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItzmehTeeHee

      When to use quomodo and quid?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      "Quid" is "what".
      "Quomodo" (quo + modo = in what manner) is "how".

      Please read the other comments on this page for more details.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItzmehTeeHee

      Ooh okay thank you!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlyshiaL.E

      Why is it only some times translated to Marce and some times Marcus. I got the answer wrong over the name.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      It is the difference between the nominative case (Marcus) and the vocative case (Marce). There are several explanations of this in this discussion so please go through them if you need more explanation.

      The nominative is used when he is the subject of the sentence, the doer of the action. Marcus Liviam videt -> "Marcus sees Livia" : Here, Marcus is doing the action, he is the one seeing.

      The vocative is used when the speaker is directly addressing this person or thing. Marce, videsne Liviam? -> "Marcus, do you see Livia?" : Here, the question is directly addressed to Marcus, he is the 2nd person ('you') subject of vides. The same here where we are asking how Marcus is doing.

      Note that the ending for the vocative is normally the same as the nominative, except for 2nd declension nouns that have a -us ending in the nominative.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karina.vir

      In the suggestion, it said quomodo TU te habes, Marcus. Why did it mark it wrong if i followed what i was learning?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      I can't tell what it marked wrong unless you show us your answer.

      The tu is optional. You shouldn't have been marked wrong just for that. If you were, it's because Lain is still being developed and nobody has added "tu" to the list of acceptable answers.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      You have to use Marce and not Marcus.

      I agree with Guillermo8330 about tu.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      Oh, of course! I didn't even see that, Moopish. I've been neglecting the Latin of late. Obviously. Thanks for helping Katrina AND me!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pauline931892

      so I wrote Quomodo Marce te habes and was marked wrong !! surely it doesn't matter the order?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

      As Rae.F explains elsewhere, names of people you are addressing sit outside the rest of the sentence. So Marce needs to go first or last in this case.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alobo_78

      I wrote Marcus and my answer was refused


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      If we are directly addressing someone, then we need to put their name into the vocative form in Latin. Normally, it is the same as the nominative, but for a name like Marcus the vocative is Marce.

      This is explained in more detail elsewhere in this discussion.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Domy13032005

      It corrects me as Marcus if I use marce


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali928612

      What is with “Marce”?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

      It puts Marcus into the vocative case, the case which is used when addressing someone. Since we are asking Marcus how he is doing, we are addressing him.

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