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  5. "Senex sollicitus illum pavon…

"Senex sollicitus illum pavonem gustat."

Translation:The worried old man tastes that peacock.

August 29, 2019

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacopoSannazaro

Why is there a continuing "s" sound between "sollicitus" and "illum"? The recording sounds like "sillum." Is it the same as the French liaison sound (consonant before a vowel) or just a pronunciation mistake? Thank you in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I could not understand the word "illum" at all. This seems like a mistake, to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cervido

In Latin scansion, final consonants attach to first syllable of the next word if the next word begins with a vowel. To illustrate, here is how "sollicitus illum" should scan:

sol-li-ci-tu-sil-lum

Source: "Dē Latīnē Prōnūntiandō" by ScorpioMartianus, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRG0sMUFvY0 (3:09)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hydrntc

Romans ate peacocks?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Not routinely, though; it was a display of luxury that some condemned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martha94435

All rich people would sometimes eat peacocks, until about 100 or 150 years ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

The hints show illum as "that man". What does illum mean in this sentence ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

It is a demonstrative pronoun, used when referring to something far removed in space, sometimes also in time.

'The worried old man tastes that peacock over there.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Thanks for answering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

Latin had no dedicated 3rd-person personal pronouns and used various demonstratives for those purposes. "Ille" primarily means "that" but can also mean "he" or "that man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4
  • 1366

It means "that"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulKohler1

Can I just say, this sentence is so bizarre. Did Romans eat peacock?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It was considered a luxury item, and was consumed by those that flaunted their wealth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria356865

As in Plautus's Cena Trimalchionis. Eating dormice rolled in honey and nuts, as far as I remember ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Glīrēs , yes; supposed to be a delicacy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

May I ask, is "worried" the best way to translate "sollicitus"? Would "concerned" be a reasonable translation? I ask, because so often the English here is stilted, so I wonder if those choosing the English words always have a good grasp on actual English usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

I'm neither worried nor concerned by this translation of "sollicitus". Although there are instances in this course where the English usage does seem very stilted - "leisurely women" comes to mind - I don't think this is one of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaRowe2

I figured that the old guy was worried about the freshness or flavor of the peacock.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Illum can also have the alternative form "ellum".

Ellum: 2nd c. BC., PLAUTUS

http://www.dicolatin.com/FR/LAK/0/ILLUM/index.htm (in French)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

I have trouble understanding "illum". In this sentence, it refers to the peacock. Can anyone help write for me "that worried old man tastes the peacock"? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

Thanks for your quick response, Rae. That clears things up. Gracias de nuevo.

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