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  5. "The boys are in Rome."

"The boys are in Rome."

Translation:Pueri sunt Romae.

August 29, 2019

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxFerguso13

Why does this sentence not require in: Pueri in Romae sunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

"Roma" is the name of a city. The names of towns, cities, and small islands take the locative case, which means they do not take a preposition.

All other nouns (with the exception of the words "domus", "humus", and "rus", which take the locative) take a preposition plus the ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon269252

Why not "romae sunt pueri"? As in, "in rome are the boys"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimberly516423

When does sunt go at the end vs. the middle? Why not Pueri Romae sunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

Latin is a little bit flexible. It's generally SOV (subject object verb), but "esse/to be" is a verb of state, not of action, so there is no object but rather a subject complement. Both SCV and SVC are valid. SVC is sometimes used to make it clear that we're saying "The boys are in Rome" and not "The boys in Rome are..."

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