1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "The sick men are in the foru…

"The sick men are in the forum."

Translation:Aegri sunt in foro.

August 29, 2019

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

"Aegri" is masculine, so the word "viri" (men) isn't needed in Latin. This is an example of a substantive adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clytia

Ok, but then why isn't "aegra" sick woman? A few questions earlier it seemed I had to say "femina aegra"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Well it is technically correct, so feel free to report it.

It is possible that the lesson would prefer you to put the noun in order to practice noun-ask agreement, but the noun is not needed here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom729640

Why not Aegri in foro sunt? The order of nouns and verbs is very inconsistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Both are acceptable and should be counted correct, though since "to be" is a linking verb, it often appears in the middle like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

As far as I know, both sequences should be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom729640

I agree, Heike, but there are many instances of some similar constructions being marked as wrong while others are allowed. There seems to be no consistency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

I think this is part of the course being in "Beta": Not all possibilities have been included yet.

I reported two or three English sentences today in which I used perfectly normal word orders. These will be included in the set of correct answers. The same applies to the Latin word orders (but with Latin I'm not as confident in reporting as in English).

I think it is important that we continue reporting the sentences that we definitely know are correct, following this guideline: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33853120

In this way, the number of problems will be reduced.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(By now, it's accepted.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"The sick are in the forum", as a category in English, meaning a plural. It's also okay? What do you think?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

I think that it is OK, but I am not a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonRusht1

Could 'men' be inclusive and include men and women?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Normally "sick people" should work, because it can be a mixed group, you're right. (or just "the sick").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, that was always the traditional understanding of how it worked.

(Only if you say aegrae, with a specifically feminine plural, do we know that the "they" / "the sick" are specifically and exclusively female.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krista189497

the word aeger can also be an adjective. hence why then would viri aegri in foro sunt be marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

“Aegri” is an adjective. It’s a substantive adjective, but you are correct that adding “viri” should be fine.

See my comment at the top of the page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heslaran

Would it be ok to say "viri aegros" ? Is it the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

No, because the noun viri (nom. pl.) and the adjective aegros (accus. pl.) don't "agree". We need either viri aegri (THEY, the sick men) or viros aegros (THEM, the sick men). Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heslaran

It helps immensely. I'm aware of the endings, but often get my nominative and accusative mixed up. That makes perfect sense. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aqilokoq

"Viri aegri in foro sunt" is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael978588

What is wrong with "Viri aegroti in foro sunt"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

Why is it "in foro" but "in ludum"? This keeps tripping me up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heslaran

It depends on the sentence. It's ablative if there is no change in state. In other words if you start and end the action in the market, then it's foro. If you start and end in school, it's ludo. If you start outside the market and go INTO it, it's forum, and if you go INTO the school, it's ludum. Generally, if "in" can be translated as "into", then it's accusative (forum/ludum). But if not, it's ablative (foro/ludo)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

Oh! Yes! And the particular sentences I have been wrestling with are "Aegri sunt in foro" (static location) and "Puellae sanae in ludum eunt" (motion toward).

Which shifts the question: Why is it "in ludum" and not "ad ludum"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That might be idiomatic--

ad + accus. suggests "towards" a place, whereas in + accus. means "(all the way) into" a place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

Hm. I'm not sure I'm seeing the distinction very well, but I'll work on remembering these examples.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I don't know if I'm right, but I think of: ad piscinam = (running) toward the pond in piscinam = (running/jumping) into the pond

That is, with "in + accus.," you wind up INSIDE.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

I get what you're saying. I guess I'm just accustomed to the distinction being motion within vs motion toward (jumping on the bed vs jumping onto the bed), and now there is a third distinction that until now I had been lumping in with the second one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

“In” and “ad” with accusative are more of a Venn diagram situation. In many cases they can be used interchangeably for “to(ward)”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.E.P.

Oportet eis domi esse


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Ita vero! Necesse est eis domi esse. Oportet eos domi esse.

Debemus nos omnes domi manere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

Nominative vs ablative. We're saying where the men are, so it's "in" plus the ablative case.
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:forum


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
Latin verb forms

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.