https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apainintheneck

Great Spanish Book for Beginner and Intermediate Learners

Over the last week or so, I've been reading this book called "Poco a Poco" by Guillermo Hall. It is uses the direct/natural method to teach you Spanish through reading. This means that it teaches you to read in Spanish purely through context and pictures, no translating. I've thoroughly enjoyed the book and wish I knew about it when I started my Spanish journey. It is not perfect though.

Advantages: Teaches Spanish without translating. Is accessible for beginners and increases in difficulty gradually. It has lots of dialogue. The book is free. Disadvantages: Was written in 1917 so it is very formal (lots of usted) and occasionally it uses archaic forms. For example: it uses Vd. and Vds. which are old abbreviations for usted and ustedes.

Download it here: https://archive.org/details/pocopocoelementa00hallrich

Overall, I think it is a great resource to jumpstart your reading before eventually jumping into native material.

P. S. I just found out that this author published another shorter book in 1899 called "Conversaciones Españolas" that attempts to explain basic grammar and constructions purely through dialogue in Spanish.

Download it here: https://archive.org/details/conversacionese00avilgoog

Happy learning!

August 29, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaisyRose2

Thank you so much for sharing these useful resources! I will be reading Poco a poco for sure.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethal838548

Great link,thanks. One question, I notice on pg 1 an example that reads "¿Es grande la rata? (Is the rat big?), but using Duolingo a question like this would be shown as ¿La rata es grande? Until using Duo, I had learnt the first way, but have now become more accustomed to the second (Duolingo) way. Are they both correct? Is the a difference?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apainintheneck

There might be a small difference in emphasis but I think that both are correct. This is a good example of how word order can be flexible in Spanish. It's something you just have to get used to over time while reading and listening to the language. The same thing happens in English too but we don't even think about it.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasjv

Yeah, this takes some getting used to. I checked in one of my grammar books, and this is indeed a correct question, and both mean the same thing. Good catch, Lethal838548!

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StrikeYT

Amazing! I'll check it out :) Have a lingot

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasjv

Poco a poco looks great! Thanks for sharing - have a lingot! Will read before starting my long-term goal - Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal!

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaarinkaaihue

YAY! Harry Potter books are great to read in other languages. I also like any other YA series because they contain "current" dialogue. Most (english or french etc in to spanish) book translations I notice come out of Madrid so they are usually "Spain spanish" so depending on where you will be speaking your newly acquired language it can be a little different. (I live in Perú now but I speak Mexican spanish.)

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaEfimova

Thank you!

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ricardo471270

Good for you.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HumaShaz

Thank you so much for sharing this resource with all of us.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaghavGupt9202

Thank you so much for sharing this information

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaarinkaaihue

gracias

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilykate94

So good to know! Thank you!

August 30, 2019
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