"Corinna maritum pium habet."

Translation:Corinna has a dutiful husband.

August 29, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanKaufman

Keep in mind, pius can also mean pious, especially in ecclesiastical Latin.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

Came here to say the same. Pius Aeneas!

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Please use the Report Button.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33853120

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

I'm not really confused about reporting, it's a duolingo issue. On the phone when you report something, it gives you a chance to type in a note. On a computer it does not. Is there a way to do that on the computer not in the discussion? *I checked the post again, to be sure: Only use a sentence discussion to explain an answer if you don't have the freewrite option and it really needs an explanation. Sure, some of the explanations probably weren't super necessary. But Beta testing is frustrating on both sides, so don't think I'm being argumentative just or be argumentative. I enjoy the course, and what it's designed to do, even if I passionately disagree on some things.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

If your translation isn't accepted, and you click my translations should have been accepted, we get a red flag and your translation.

On Android there is a free write option, but generally those messages are not helpful.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Except if you want to explain why you think it has to be accepted of why the sentence is not helpful (linking to a grammar rule for instance)

Generally, yes, I imagine, a lot of false reports from beginners or inattentive people, but generally doesn't mean always, and it's very frustrating to click on "report the audio", for instance, without being able to explain what's the problem.

I wonder if the "report" option is really helpful, when the contributors of the course receive a "there's a mistake here", and don't know where the mistake is supposed to be, nor why.

I'm with you, Colin.

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

Lol, this was before I started contributing, but I appreciate the solidarity. I see both sides of the argument.

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

So as I am understanding it, adjectives follow the noun or pronoun they modify. Are there any exceptions to this rule?

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterScham1

Latin word order is very flexible, so there is no hard and fast rule for this. However, you are correct that adjectives typically* follow the noun, unless the intent is to emphasize the adjective.

*There are some adjectives that are more commonly placed first. Numeral adjectives, adjectives of quantity, adjectives of size, demonstrative, relative, and interrogative pronouns and adverbs, tend to precede the word or words to which they belong. (from section b of: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=AG+598 and also from http://rharriso.sites.truman.edu/latin-language/latin-word-order/)

So, quinque mariti (5 husbands), or parvus puer (the small boy), but most of the rest will come second unless intentionally emphasized (and one could argue that the preceding examples are the way they are because these adjectives are typically added for emphasis anyways).

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

Glad to hear about the men being dutiful for a change! Modern teachings of older languages seem to be mired in the misconception that it is the wife's job to be dutiful.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanna777424

"Corinna`s husband is dutiful". Wrong?

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

Yes. Habet denotes possession here.

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatDoyle7

Why is the subject matter so grim for latin

September 9, 2019
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