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"The mother writes and the brother sleeps at home."

Translation:Mater scribit et frater domi dormit.

August 29, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Does the position of the "domi" make any difference to who's at home? I.e. can it be implied that the mother is at home too while the "domi" is in the latter half of the sentence? If I said "Mater scribit domi et frater dormit", would it still sound like the brother is also at home?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

As there is no coma in Latin, I think the "et" serves as a coordination word, separing the clauses.

Scribit mater ET domi dormit frater.
(by the way, I don't know if it would sound logical if I have something like Scribit mater ET domi frater dormit, not grammatically, I mean logically)

I think you can play with the order of the word in clause 1 (Mater scribit) and clause 2 (Frater dormit domi), but not place one word from one clause to the other one.

Mater scribit ET frater domi dormit.

Please, correct me if I say something's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WynnWalk-Martin

I would say since in the English it pretty clear that the brother sleeps at home, that is why I included domi in the second clause concerning the brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Igorolozin

You are thinking in english, but you need to think in latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

How about ‘māter scrībit domīque frāter dormit’? To the best of my knowledge, -que is a stronger joint whereas et is a more separating conjuction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WynnWalk-Martin

I must say that I am not surprised. I I tried this as an experiment, and sadly I was correct in assuming it would not count it. "-que" is definitely a sufficient and incredibly common (see Vergil's frequent use of it in the Aeneid) alternative to "et." "-que" should almost always be accepted in place of "et."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

While it's in Beta we must put up with a limited word bank or variants in answers. I keep getting caught out choosing etiam over quoque...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

We don't have to just put up with it. When a valid answer is rejected, you need to flag it and report "My answer should be accepted." That's the point of beta, to get user feedback.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Martin, What was your sentence (I'd like to know to learn)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thequietgiraffe

Are both the mother and brother at home, or just the brother? Or is it ambiguous?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WynnWalk-Martin

In the English is pretty obvious that the brother is the one sleeping at home, but it could be ambiguous. I put dormi in the brother clause since in the English is proximity to brother would suggest that the brother sleeps at home different from what the mother is doing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kainat546172

Isnt frater father? Whereas the statement mentions brother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No, "frater" is "brother", hence college fraternities.
"Pater" is "father", hence patriarchy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kainat546172

Ohhhh thanks a lot! That helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leenitas

I don't get it. sometimes it's "Frater domi dormit" and sometimes it's "XY scribit IN domi". can someone please explain when to use in and when not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I haven't come across "in domi".

"Domus" is one of the very small handful of common nouns that have the locative case, which is primarily used with the names of cities/towns and small islands. All other nouns take "in" plus the ablative case. If "domus" did not have the locative, it would be "in domu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaHammit2

i got it i`m so proud of my self


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorgar4

Is there any connection between domi and dormit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No, they come from two different PIE roots, *dem- (house; household) and *drem- (to sleep).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

For those unfamiliar with the term PIE, it means Proto-Indo European, the ancestor from which it is believed that the great majority of European languages (apart from Basque, Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian) and quite a few Asian ones have sprung.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Further information: Linguists are about as certain as they can be about the relationship between the various Indo-European languages and the existence of PIE. The educated guesswork comes in attempting to reconstruct what it might have sounded like. That's why it's called Proto-Indo-European but Latin is not "Proto-Romance": because Latin is fully attested. If we knew nothing about Latin and needed to reconstruct it from the extant Romance languages, then it would be called "Proto-Romance" and not "Latin". I would not say "Asian" languages, though, as that can be misleading. This is the IE family tree:


https://i.imgur.com/9X6UJfE.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Are there interesting resources in the Internet about Indo-European roots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I look up a word on Wiktionary and follow the relevant links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berolino

Scribit mater, et frater in domo dormit. Why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Because the locative of domo is domi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

‘Pay attention to the accents’, it nags; clearly ‘māter scrībit et frāter domī dormit’ is the preferred answer, not without macrons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tortugaysion

Well the macrons weren't used in the ancient roman writing, it's a modern thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikkhumaira

wait im confused. domi is home and dormit is sleep. right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

In the broadest strokes, yes. However...

domī is the locative "at home"
declension of domus

dormit is the 3rd person singular "he/she/it sleeps"
conjugation of dormiō, dormī́re


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

Domī is at home, and dormit is he/she/it sleeps. Depending on which declension pattern is followed, domī can also mean of home, but that is beyond this lesson’s grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanne_Wie

Isn't it "in domi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No. The locative case does not take any prepositions.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanne_Wie

Thanks! I forgot that the locative case exists, as it is so rarely used. I got confused with the ablative, but then it would have to be "in domo" I guess. Again thanks for the refresher!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianeOKeef2

I'M GETTING MIXED UP BETWEEN "DORMI" AND "DORMIT"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Please don't shout.

We haven't been introduced to "dormi" yet, but it's the singular imperative "Sleep!"

  • "Dormit" is the 3rd person singular "he/she/it sleeps".
  • "Domi" is the locative of "domus", which is "house/home".

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaSton759465

Should this sentence not have the preposition ad in it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No. "Domus" is one of the words that takes the locative, which means it becomes "domi" and no preposition is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justice149786

Please tell me how yo spek latina


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

The best guide is Vox Latina by Allen (ISBN-13: 978-0521379366). It is available via Amazon.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.