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"Please give me thirty cookies."

Translation:Quaeso, da mihi triginta crustula.

August 29, 2019

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iosephus14

Flexibility of latin does not allow "triginta crustula da mihi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I'm sure it does. Your version seems to lay emphasis on the (large) number of cookies you're asking for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

I think you're overestimating Latin's flexibility.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariusBrez

No more than this program does. I see no reason to assume the approved answer here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

Quaesto literally means "I beg/ask".

If anyone's interested, the collects (prayers) in the traditional Roman Missal often start with, or contain, "Præsta quæsumus", or "Grant, we beseech Thee."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

"Please" is very loose. Much better option would be imperative with "amabo te" for please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Why "quaeso" is not good? Could you explain further?

When I read this, I tend to think that quaeso is also ok:
https://latin.stackexchange.com/questions/1563/how-do-you-say-please-in-classical-latin

From this page:
There's also "Si tibi placet" that looks really like the French "S'il te plait".
"A vobis peto" (I ask/beg you)

By the way, "plaît" in s'il te plaît, is the root for the English please (from the conjugated form "plaise")
And French "plaisir" (from the form "plaise") is the root of the English "pleasure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCrame11

"et te amabo" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCrame11

“And I will love you” is a way of saying “please”. “Give me thirty cookies and I will love you.” The Roman “do ut des” philosophy/approach to religion revealing itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Word-order problem: I think it should be possible to "embed" the politeness word (quaeso, or amabo te) in the request. "Da mihi, quaeso, triginta crustula" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, but you would change dramatically the emphasis.
It would be the same dramatic emphasis, than "Give me, please, 30 cookies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Not dramatically different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoemgenusO

Quaeso saepius cum subjunctivo adhibetur, i.e. "Des mihi quaeso..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colleen289785

Quaeso , triginta crustula da mihi . Why is this incorrect please. .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It's not incorrect (even if it didn't get accepted).

You've placed emphasis on the "thirty cookies" you want, by placing those words in front of "give me." Nothing wrong with that; you should report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colleen289785

Crustula, crustulum is causing me confusion....Help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

This particular noun is a 2nd declension neuter noun; so crustulum means "a cookie" (singular) either as a subject (nominative) or a direct object (accusative): "I want a cookie" = Crustulum volō ; "The cookie pleases me"= Crustulum mihi placet . Since the noun is neuter, its nominative and accusative cases are identical.

In the plural, in the nominative and accusative cases (again, for neuter nouns, these are always identical), the form is crustula , "cookies." So, "I want 30 cookies" = Trīgintā crustula volō . "The cookies please me" = Mihi placent crustula .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

It's a matter of nominative (subject), accusative (direct object), etc.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Settra

Is crustula an accusative plural in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes; it's a neuter plural accusative, the direct object of da . The invariable number-adjective triginta modifies crustula .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul328081

"Da sis mihi triginta crustula" should be accepted, shouldn't it?. I know that "sis" means "please."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That's right; sīs = "if you wish" (sī + vīs), therefore "please."

Since this is a command directed to a singular person (= the imperative da is singular), it seems appropriate to use sīs here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

Fun fact: The Catholic church uses the word "quæsumus" in the Latin Mass, which is the first person plural version of "quæso" if I'm not mistaken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaBala282823

why not: Da mihi,quaeso, triginta olivas" Conferatur Cicero: Tu, quaeso, scribe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/der_Rabe

... and I read "dirty cookies" at first. g "oh yeah, give me the dirty cookies, baby!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaia134486

Would "Da mihi quaeso triginta crustula" not work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teaselcardere

Others have asked, but there seems to be no change. Why is "Quaeso triginta crustula da mihi" still considered to be incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

My impression is that they tend to 'embed' the quaesō rather than leading with it (it's parenthetical, so to speak). So maybe start with the da mihi and put the quaeso later: Da mihi, quaesō, trīgintā crustula or something like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YiddishSingerMax

Why not "da me..."? (like in Spanish)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Because Latin has a dative case for indirect object ( = mihi ). The is for accusative or ablative cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Spanish simplified the pronoun system of Latin, but the dative mihi became stressed pronoun .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBehun

ARE NUMBERS DECLINED? IF SO WHY ISN'T THIS EXPLAINED


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

the numbers one, two, and three are declined; they have different forms for case (nom/gen/dat/acc/abl) and gender (m/f/n).

But from four on up, they have only one, indeclinable form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoemgenusO

Also, multiple hundreds and multiple thousands decline.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yup; for example, centum (indeclinable) = one hundred, but, e.g., quīngentī, quīngentae, quīngenta are the 3 nominative plural forms (m/f/n) for "five hundred."

The genitives plural would be quīngentōrum, quīngentārum, quīngentōrum , the datives/ablatives all quīngentīs , and the accusatives quīngentōs, quīngentās, quīngenta . Straightforward 1st/2nd decl. endings.

A thousand is the indeclinable mīlle ; but plural thousands use a number + neuter plural mīlia, mīlium , a 3rd decl plural neuter noun. (So, its dative/abl plural is mīlibus .)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2613

Only a handful of numbers are declined. And please don't shout.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

Quaeso isn't a good "please." Sounds Spanish rather than Latin.

Further..."crustula" is singular and not plural. "Triginta" does not decline, but "crustula" should be "crustulae."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Crustulum is second declension neuter, so crustula is nominative and accusative plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

Yeah. I was thinking of the feminine noun "crustula" rather than neuter "crustulum." Stupid mistake on my part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Crustula", feminine, a little crusta (=a little crust)

But in the Gaffiot, they say that both Crustulum (sing, n), et Crustula (sing, f), could be used to mean "biscuit".

The use of Crustula, the feminine, seems a late Latin use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inconcinna

I think amabo te is a good alternative but quaeso is perfectly acceptable. Quaeso is often used to ask for things or in prayers to beseech the gods; Lewis and Short's Latin Dictionary cites examples from Livy and Cato with this usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Is Amabo te, lit. "I will love you", used in Latin for "Please"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Yes, it is a common idiomatic phrase for "please."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If someone knows Indonesian (langage having several ways to express "please")

What would be mohon, and tolong in Latin?

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