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  5. "Multae horae sunt."

"Multae horae sunt."

Translation:There are many hours.

August 29, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4
  • 1366

The male speaker sounds more worked up with each successive sentence. (At least in the order I'm hearing them today)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randybvain

Indeed, he seems to foresee some disastrous event :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe792929

He's definitely fired up about the existence of many hours. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GilbertBes

Yes, he really seems to have a bee in his bonnet about something. I also do the Russian course but the computerised voice never sounds this dramatic!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mab615805

Much better with human voices recorded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otisagabey

exactly what I came here to say


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Interesting sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes--in the sense that it's meaningless?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaphos1

What's that supposed to mean? Like: there are many hours left? Or the opposite: it's late? Or is it some Duolingo gibberish, i.e. we know the words and the grammar, so let's arrange them in a very nonsensical way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I don't think it means anything, except as a permutation of vocabulary.

There are only twelve hours (of the day), after all!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MedMaxIII

In Czech we usually say "Je hodně hodin" (literally "It's a lot of hours") to express that it's late, perhaps this is the same case with a poor English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Was the h silent in classical Latin? I didn't think it was.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I've read articles about Latin pronunciation where they say it was pronounced. So, I think it should.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bshannon

I'm no expert but I've watched a video suggesting that because Romans regularly misspelled words by forgetting the 'h' it is understood to be silent.

What Latin Sounded Like - and how we know by NativLang on YouTube


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

With so few being literate, yes we saw much misspelling. The “h” is more a sigh breathing sound, than a latter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

There's a funny Catullus poem that mocks a social climber who anxiously puts the "h" in the wrong places--suggesting that it was pronounced by some dialects in some words, I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonGilli14

Stuff like that is so cool. I love how much we can uncover about how these ancient people said what they said by what they wrote about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiSucharda

Couldn't "It is late" be also accepted? At least this is how I interpret the meaning of this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

I don’t think so, but I will admit, the sentence doesn’t strike me as something you’d read in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBetz

It's really annoying. If it's not idiomatic, it's not actually part of the language... and it shouldn't be on Duolingo. Fake words (Novum Eboracum) and truly inane sentences make a mockery of the study of the classics.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Novum Eboracum is not a fake word, it's in New York (Latin) motto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcl119511

I can recommend this wiki article on city names in Latin :)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Latin_names_of_cities

"Novum Eboracum or Neo-Eboracum represents New York, because Eboracum is the city of York in England"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoForrest

Ikr? 24 is like waAY TOo much,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

On this first day of DST - one less. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jss.___

There is a lot of hours.

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