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  5. "Nolite deos rogare!"

"Nolite deos rogare!"

Translation:Don't ask the gods!

August 29, 2019

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Noli = don't you (sing)

Nolite = don't you (pl)

Is this correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes.

They the present imperative forms of nolo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

da mihi astram auram! LOL

Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes. It might help to think of them as meaning "Refuse", and then the fact that the verb's INFINITIVE is added, to make the 2-part negative command, makes more sense: "Refuse TO THROW the spear!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qwynneth662

Actually, nolle means "to be unwilling". "Velle" is "to want". "Nolle" is "to not want" [non velle but contracted]. "Malle" is "to rather want". So the imperative of nolle commands the 2nd person to be unwilling to execute the infinitive that follows it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That's right; "refuse" = "be unwilling." The negative command structure is rather like telling someone, "Don't even WANT to throw that spear!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul704844

The current reader does seem to sing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carpetini

What interesting way to promote atheism!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Nolite deos rogare aut ei ad vos fulmina contorquent. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/__henry__

loqueris bene!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetalLover

I really love this man's delivery.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkylarTheWolf3

im so sad they removed it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VBTQRK

I'll just add one more voice to the choir praising this speaker. Half the fun of this course comes from listening to his delivery. More please!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NephDemiG

Could this also be translated as "Don't question the gods"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I don't think so.

It looks (from the Oxford Latin Dictionary) as though rogāre means to ask someone a question; to ask someone for his opinion; to request things; but those seem to be distinct from the (very interesting) "questioning OF the gods," i.e., calling them (their existence, I think you mean?) into question.

(Unless I'm simply missing something in that entry.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NephDemiG

Yes, calling them/their existence into question is one possible meaning of the sentence ("Don't question the gods") I am asking about! Rather than their existence, though, I was thinking more along the lines of not questioning/doubting their decisions/commands/actions, much in the way one might be told not to question ones parents or an elder/superior/authority figure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carpetini

What is the difference between nolite and noli?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

noli -> "don't" when directed at one person. It's the second person present imperative singular. "Marcus, don't ask the gods!" -> Marce, noli deos rogare!

nolite -> "don't" when directed at multiple people. It's the second person present imperative plural. "Marcus and Livia, don't ask the gods" -> Marce et Livia, nolite deos rogare!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tre_mojosa

Ah, sort of like 'salve' and 'salvete.' Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen122808

I think this the same guy who used to slur his words so much that I couldn't understand when one word ended and the next one began.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeuamP

The translator is certainly dramatic.

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