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"Where do your sons study?"

Translation:Ubi student filii tui?

August 29, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaby294745

"Ubi filii tui student" should also be a correct translation, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

This is a question, so the verb comes earlier in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inconcinna

Correct. Your answer is preferable since typically Latin verbs go at the end of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

By curiosity, I wondered if there were some kind of subject-verb inversion in Latin, to indicate a question, despite of the free order.
If we consider the SOV as the most common way, there's indeed a kind of inversion.

Affirmative (most common)
Caesar inimicum superavit. (Caesar defeated the enemy.)

Turning this sentence into a question (subject-verb inversion to add the "-ne" suffix)
Superavitne Caesar inimicum? (Did Caesar defeat the enemy?)

I think it only works for the yes/no question generated by the -ne suffix.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

Yes. In fact, that is what I put because that is how I was taught, and it is an acceptable answer. "Ubi" indicates that it is a question, so the verb can either be before or after the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vorobyey

More inconsistency with the accepted word order. This is so frustrating


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt200470

How are the sentences supposed to be arranged? I've seen it stated that the verb goes at the end, but the verb seems to be at the start. Am I missing something??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

Declarative sentences are generally subject object verb. But questions tend to move the focus word to the front.

Puer est. He is a boy.
Estne puer? Is he a boy?

Filii tui Romae student. Your sons study in Rome.
Ubi student filii tui? Where do your sons study?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboyer02

Searching for how questions are formed revealed the following results: 9-    Asking a Question Lesson Latin has three ways of turning a statement into a question. The first way is to place the key word at the start of the sentence and add –ne, so that:   Marcus in civitate habitat (Marcus lives in the city)   becomes:   habitatne Marcus in civitate? (Does Marcus live in the city?)   If you want to alter the emphasis of the question, simply attach -ne to a different word and place that at the beginning of the sentence, for example:   Marcusne habitat in civitate? (Is it Marcus who lives in the city?)   The second way is used when a ‘yes’ answer is expected. Simply place nonne at the start of the sentence:   nonne Roma optima civitas est in mundo? (Surely Rome is the best city in the world? / Rome is the best city in the world, isn’t it?)   Thirdly, if you expect a ‘no’ answer, begin the sentence with num:   num putas barbaros victuros esse? (Surely you don’t think the barbarians will win? / You don’t think the barbarians will win, do you?)   http://mylanguages.org/latin_grammar.php


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nkp2ro

Difference between tui and tuae?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levan021

Why is "Filii tui ubi student" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

The question word comes first, then the focus of the question.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33856526?comment_id=37494237


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.Ib0Q09

Difference in tui and tuae?

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