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  5. "Sum fartus pane."

"Sum fartus pane."

Translation:I am stuffed with bread.

August 29, 2019

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Said the turkey at Christmas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alessia120502

I was thinking the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Do you stuff them with bread? Here it's only with meat and spices. (I think it's more tasty than bread).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zac551962

You stuff meat... with more meat? Respect. Here we stuff it with bread and herbs mostly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Didn't the Romans show off by stuffing a swan with a peacock, the peacock with a goose, the goose with a chicken, and end up with a sparrow stuffed in them? We can buy something similar called a five bird roast. I have seen a seven bird roast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMcAyRuo

AHAHA XD

relatable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

For anyone going into Spanish or Portuguese, "estar harto de [algo]" (Spanish) and "estar farto de [alguma coisa]" (Portuguese) means to be fed up with [something].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

Correct, and in South America it’s also an adverb meaning “a lot”. For example: «comimos harto» we ate loads/a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In French: farci (farcir), la farce. Yummy tomates farcies.

From Latin "farsa" (alternative of "farta")
From Latin farcire = to stuff something.

The figurative meaning of "farcir" is not to be full for an human, but it can be used for things, too full of something.
It can also be used "se farcir" something, meaning that you are forced to bear something a bit overwhelming.

In Italian: Farcia

Please, note that French and Italian comes from "farsus/farsa" that are the alternatives for "Fartus/Farta".
And another one is "Farcitus/Farcita".

I didn't test, but all of them should be accepted here.
Personally, I prefer to use Farcitus, as it looks a lot like its verb "farcire".

Source: http://www.dicolatin.com/XY/LAK/0/FARSA/index.htm

Other words from this root:
Fartilis: fattened
Fartor, butcher
Fartum, noun, stuffing material/mixed meat.
Fartus, stuffed or full of something

2 meanings related with the meat, and the fact to be full of something.

I don't think that Romans stuffed things with bread, considering the etymology, it's more likely that they stuffed them with meat, like in Latin countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

methinks the culinary necessity of this phrase yielded to its undeniable potential for mischief...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

Some farts are a pain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MILADIOU

It sounds rather rude in English English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Beans have that effect on me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Would you use rather "repute" to sound polite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul43308

Why didn't we have sentences like this when I was at school? We had people laying waste the fields and preparing walls and ditches against the Belgae and assorted barbarians. So much more peaceful to have pissed parrots - both angry and drunk - and weasels catching mice. Congratulations team. I hated Latin at school 60 years ago, but I've really enjoyed myself here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnaraOkami

I farted when I got this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

Maybe this was a unusual torture. It beats flogging or disemboweling!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

I dont know about rome, but I do believe it was a used as a punishment in some places, probobly poetic justice for gluttony or somthing like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catherine.539406

So, as a female-type lady person - sum farta pane?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Yes, exactly like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

how come it is not 'cum pane'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

Thats what I want to know too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

pane is in the ablative, which includes the prepositions 'by', 'with', and 'from'. Latin doesn't need the extra words we use in English (and other languages), it uses instead the altered word endings.

'cum' is used when one is in the company of someone.

https://www.thoughtco.com/cases-of-latin-nouns-117588#:~:text=Ablative%20(ablativus)%3A%20Used%20to,)%3A%20Used%20for%20direct%20address.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael783437

Could this be "I have been stuffed with bread"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's not the past, it's a present state.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael783437

But 'fartus sum' is the perfect passive of farcio, so how do we know it's present? The word order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I'm too novice (Someone will correct me, or I'll correct it in a few weeks hopefully), but my guess is:
I am stuffed is not a passive, but it's called a participal. I would call it past participle in French grammar. I think that "I am stuffed" means you have been stuffed, before (passive voice). In this context, I'm stuffed, and I've been stuffed are the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If it means I am full, I am repute because I ate too much bread, I doubt that the Latin language used "fartus sum" for this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rahar109

I think you mean "replete", not "repute". They mean entirely different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J0HNPIERRE

I am F A R T U S !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzXDkf

How would it be in Latin 'I am being stuffed' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael783437

Farcior

Almost all Latin verbs have active forms and passive forms, so you only need the one word where sometimes English needs three or four.

Farcio = I am stuffing/I stuff

Farcior = I am being stuffed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

Life is bread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Pavo sum...

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