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  5. "Your name is Marcus."

"Your name is Marcus."

Translation:Nomen tibi est Marcus.

August 29, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArturBrzos

Wth once I write Marce, it is right. Other time i write Marcus it is wrong, and the I write Marcus again and it is right? Choose which form should we use ....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

If it is the subject or subject complement, then it is in nominative form Marcus.

If you are using his name to call out to him, then it is in the vocative form Marce.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

Why non nomen tuum. Nomen tibi makes me think of a dativus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Li_tap

Latin has cases, depending on what's doing the word in the sentenc it ends different to show that. Not only with the names but also adjectives, verbs, and almost any word in latin.

Marcus is a boy Hello, Marce


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

Would the word order "Nomen tibi Marcus est" also be possible? Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

That would be acceptable, but bear in mind that "esse/to be" is a copular verb and as such takes a subject complement and not any kind of object. This means that you'd have everything in the nominative on one side of "est".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaviOsorio

Wold the answer "nomen tuum est marcus" also be possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunandSteel90

I would also like to know the answer to this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camilla963357

Why is it est and not es?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

Exactly what Heike said. The subject is "your name", not "you". Whenever a possessive is involved, it is always 3rd person. Remember: "my cat is", not "my cat am".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

Because the subject of the sentence is "your name".

If the verb was "es", the sentence would be like "your name are Marcus" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_____

I've written: "Marcus est nomen tibi". But it is not correct :( I would like to know why? Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lonyid21

Your sentence reads like "Marcus is your name" making Marcus the main subject. Although it means the same thing the question is steering you towards making the name the subject, to make it read as "Your name is marcus" Technically your answer should be correct and it's just semantics. As others have said latin is very free in order like english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

Careful. "Free" word order is a misnomer. It's merely relatively flexible, and as you correctly pointed out, different otherwise correct and unremarkable sequences will have subtly different meanings, generally with regard to what is being emphasized or focused on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElanaDewey

I request clarity. I have seen Marcus spelled as Marce in your answers. I typed Marce. I was marked wrong.

I asked about this earlier.

Thank you for your help. I am grateful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

Marcus is the nominative form, used when Marcus is the subject or subject complement.

Marcus dormit.
Nomen tibi est Marcus.
Marcus est senex.

Marce is the vocative form, used when you're calling out to Marcus, using his name to address him directly.

Quo vadis, Marce?
Salve, Marce!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amir151518

Why it cant be ? tibi nomen est marcus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1755L

"Tu nomen est Marcus" I know this is not right, but just don't know why. Anyone? Thx.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

You said "You name is Marcus". You need the dative "tibi" ("Nomen tibi est Marcus." -- "The name to you is Marcus").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

But it is Marcus' name, so I expect a genitivus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2619

There was no need to post this three times. Once is enough.

There is nothing fishy about it. Different languages have different ways of saying things. Latin has both the genitive and the dative of possession, and that's what this lesson is teaching.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I had in mind Nomen tuum. Would that work too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paolo152672

Altero modo: Nomen tuum est Marcus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

This, Paolo, is what I wrote. Marcus possesses his name, like he possesses a dig. Then it should be the genitivus tuum. There is something fishy with this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Debbie697250

Agreed, if We are supposed to use Marce when talking directly to Marcus why then is "Nomen tibi est Marce." Wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntoniVal3

Marcus tibi nomen est, was accepted, that's fine! :) 2020 march covid

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