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  5. "Senex comitem habet."

"Senex comitem habet."

Translation:The old man has a comrade.

August 30, 2019

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windrammer

The Roman flag was red for a reason


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't think they were really... communist!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

More like the mafia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

ally, partner, companion should all be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think "ally" is better as "socius". It is not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siruso

Thirded. Need some flexibility with definitions! Companion is far more common than comrade.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendaniusFruust

Does "friend" qualify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dscpp

I was just about to post the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

Nobody:

Me: On a side note, this word comitem (comes, comitis) is the word from which the English word count (as a title of nobility, equivalent to the more autochtonous earl) derives ultimately, through the French comte, as well as its cognates in other languages (conde ES & PT, conte IT, comte CAT, etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Comitem (nominative comes) "companion, attendant," the Roman term for a provincial governor.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/count


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrestonSis

no less an authority on the Latin language than Julius Caesar used "comes" to mean "ally." Why can't I?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timotheus_Sum

What do you mean? Comes = ally. The reason why it is comitem is because it is in accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonPF92

I'm not sure what this sentence is supposed to say. I doubt it uses the term "comrade" in the sense of the communist/socialist address, so I'd assume it uses the term comrade in the meaning of "brother in arms", i.e. someone he used to serve with (seeing as he is an old man and is therefore most likely not an active soldier anymore), however in that case the sentence wouldn't make much sense, because the only way I could think of using it would be "He has only one comrade left" (as in: the rest that served alongside him died already), but even that's a stretch. So is it supposed to be like a political ally, as for example Crassus and Pompeius used to be to Ceasar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

The audio is awful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timotheus_Sum

Ita senex. Ok boomer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/els976518

Aged and old are about the same in my opinion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

I tried ‘The old man has a buddy’. Shouldn’t that be acceptable? I flagged it as such. If not appropriate, please do enlighten me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arturo587285

I feel judged on my English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

As in communist?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

The word comrade existed long before communism... and stands alone with its own meaning.

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