"Linguae Latinae student."

Translation:They study the Latin language.

August 30, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Urtica_

I could be wrong--and if I am could someone please explain how this answer is correct--but I am most certainly sure that "Linguae Latinae student" is grammatically incorrect. Why isn't the object taking the accusative ending? Shouldn't it be something like:

"Eae/Ii Linguam Latinum student." (They study the Latin Language.)

Again, if I'm wrong could someone please explain what's going on? Otherwise, I really hope this gets fixed soon.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Studeo, studere is one of the handful of Latin verbs that take the dative case instead of the accusative.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Urtica_

Ah okay, this makes sense. I'm somewhat familiar with swapping the accusative case with the dative case.

Would this be the same concept as the following example:

"Marco una soror est" (Marcus [with the dative -o ending] has a sister.)

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Ah yes, the dative of possession.

The book I used when I took a few courses in Latin always provided a meaning that ended with 'to' to help with remember which ones take the dative. Like for placeo it would have 'to be pleasing to'. I found it helpful.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Urtica_

Since my example is the dative of possession, what would the Duolingo example be called?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

I have seen it referred to as dative with special verbs.

This site talks about them a bit: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/dative-special-verbs

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Studere means litterally "to dedicate oneself to something", isn't it?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

That, or something like that yeah.

August 31, 2019
Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.