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  5. "Psittacus eius est ebrius."

"Psittacus eius est ebrius."

Translation:Her parrot is drunk.

August 30, 2019

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackTildeD

This sentence is funny. That is all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TERRANCEBO17

"He's not drunk, he's pining for the fjords!!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WandersFar

What do you do with a drunken parrot early in the morning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaziarMehr4

Better to be worried about what a drunken parrot can do with us


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

Psittacosis = parrot fever


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schnueffi

And stupid me was thinking Duolingo was infected with Noctuatitis!!!! (Noctua: owl, Noctuatitis: owl fever)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

So it's related to nocturnal...wow!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TERRANCEBO17

Is it a parrot - or a bowl of petunias??? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip299317

Wait... that's no moon!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHUMiami87

Pauley want a shot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ari621784

Have you been drinking too? The name's "Polly", bub. squak


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobo968226

Is there some kind of a rule in latin that if you use the word for parrot, it must be drunk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Surya-Rose

What kind of owner is she if she lets her psittacus get drunk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennifer945360

What's with this parrot? He's ALWAYS drunk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip299317

It's hard being a parrot. Don't judge!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassandraA100557

Wait a minute is she looking after her parrot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

....and soon will be no more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceClark8

I question your continual use of psittacus. It is very difficult to hear .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristam212765

Psittacus is quite difficult to say, i can see why they went with parrot in the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip299317

I will make it legal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel--M.

"Eius" is listed as meaning "her" or "his" - how are we supposed to tell; context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

Duo would not accept "his". Guess the parrot was not the only drunk bird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"Eius" is listed as meaning "her" or "his" - how are we supposed to tell; context?

Exactly.

Without context, it could be either of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenBrown958

If this parrot is drinking this much then it may well shuffle off its mortal coil and become a dead parrot, an ex-parrot. No longer alive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IMDAMIEN

⸙ NON·AGO·BENE·CALIDO·BALNEO·IVSTVS·VOLO·PVPILLAM·PASTILLVM

( ... also, someone with proper lingva latina knowledge : please do, feel free to correct this. Gratias tecvm )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edithloveslatin

What is eius i don't understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I domum, psittace; ebrius es!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcello619090

The correct answer specifies that "eius" may be masculine or feminine, so why then would "their" - a neutral pronoun - not be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

The use of their as a singular pronoun has a long history in English - at least as long ago as the late 13th century. Historically, it has been used as an indefinite antecedent (example: "Someone left their umbrella"). It modern times it has become charged with politically motivated energy, in that some groups have chosen it as a battleground in the "gender" war. The American Association for Psychological Science, that well-known authority on English grammar, has decided that their (used as a specific singular), along with ze, hen and other pronouns, should be accepted into the corpus of English vocabulary. Not everybody agrees.

Perhaps we should bear in mind that, strictly, gender (in its primary meaning) has to do with grammatical classification, and what we are really talking about in the current "gender" debate is sex or biological classification.

Until relatively recently the word ethnic meant heathen, non-Christian, and gay could only mean happy. Both these words have made a transition to new meanings that have superseded the old. "Their" used as a singular specific has not quite managed that trick yet. Although it looks set to do so, with English you can never be sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeodisMMXXI

"His parrot is drunk" seems like the best translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niklas760215

So that's where Psittacosaurus comes from. I mean, it certainly looks like a drunk parrot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/getmynameo

So, like, how often can you read Apicius' fried parrot recipe or Amores 2.6? Psittacus is not remotely a common word, and really should be removed from these exercises


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AriToumpas

This sentence is absolutely useless for learning latin. It is funny i will grant that, but it is useless


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingotLover1

No, it's teaching you words, and how they can be used in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip299317

How DARE you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceClark8

I dislike all of the parrot sentences. Poor choice.

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