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  5. "Multae lectiones in libro su…

"Multae lectiones in libro sunt."

Translation:Many chapters are in the book.

August 30, 2019

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

'lectio' is not a chapter, but a reading/lession. If chapter is what is intended here, please use 'capitulum'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

There's no source I can find that gives "lectiō, lectiōnis" as "chapter."

In fact, there are many good sources that suggest it should be "caput, capitis."

"capitulum, capitulī" could also work, though what I've read is that this is Late Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goldberry2016

I recommend "There are many chapters [or better, lessons] in the book."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardbeeson

I also think that the English translation word order is a bit strange. Normally one would say, I think, "In the book are many chapters" or "there are many chapters in the book"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It seems to indicate that the chapters can "move" or be absent.
Because you notice there are here: Yes, many chapters are in the book. Or No, many chapters aren't in the book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Multilingual03

Which case is libro? Accusative, locative or something else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

This course is in Beta, meaning it is understood that some tweaking is required to get the flow of teaching better ordered.

"In urbe" and "domi" were introduced very early, as 'set phrases', to make the sentences more interesting from the start.

This phrase is in the same vein, but where the basic theme is to introduce, and to get students confident in the recognition of and the use of the Accusative, there does seem to be a lot of casual dropping in of the Dative and Ablative, before they have been introduced and discussed.

Personally, I try never to socialize with cases to whom I have not been given a formal introduction. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

Enjoyed your last paragraph!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

It is Ablative.

You aren't going to see the Locative really. It comes up a LOT in the early stages, but by Classical Latin it fell out; it is also always without a pronoun.

Here you're looking at the Ablative of Place Where, which absorbed the Locative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Without a preposition, I think you meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In + libro.

Libro is ablative.

In + ablative = means that you have a static presence. There's no move.

It cannot be locative, because locative is only for cities (cities/towns, small islands, and a few words like domus, rus, and humus)

And the locative never has "in". It's already included inside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cosmic-Alchemist

Lessons isn't accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

i reported "there are many chapters in the book" as should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvisStulta05

You can always count on Rae to get things done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't think she's a course contributor, not for Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I do not work for Duolingo in any way, shape, or form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris.temporale

Not yet, apparently...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Make sure you have no typos or extra spaces.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

Didn't work for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dark_Omega6

"There are many chapters in a book" isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2612

Make sure you have no typos or extra spaces anywhere, then flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karatefan

The ablative and the dative should be explained in the grammar section...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Ablative here is to indicate that it's a "there is" without a motion. It's static.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuan951771

There isn't a grammar section on the phone app. All notes and explanations greatly appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The explanations are here in the forum!

But the web version is always the best one and the more complete and useful. I don't know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

Maybe the mainframe app is yet the best???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssvenska

How about "There are many chapters/lessons in the book"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No. Just pick one. The course contributors will not include answers in the form x/y.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

Given the comments posted by some course contributors, I wouldn't be surprised if the database update program choked on the character "/".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It should be rather "chapter", at least, according to what I've found Google books and PHI.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvisStulta05

Does anyone have a good method of remembering that “lectiones” is a feminine noun? I keep mistakenly using “multi” instead of “multae.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's a feminine noun ending in o. (but rather here in "tio".
Words ending in "tio" are feminine (I don't know the exceptions)
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Latin_feminine_nouns

If you speak French, all "tion" nouns are feminine nouns. They kept their Latin gender from Latin into French. La libération feminine, Latin liberatio, feminine.
It can be a memorization trick.
It's the same for instance with Spanish and the "ción" that is a feminine ending.

Here "leçon" (old form leson) is an exception, normally, it's a "tion" ending.
Lectio should have made "lection" in French and English, but it became "leson/leçon" in old French, and was borrowed in English under this form.

Almost all the English words ending with -tion are from French (a few exception, like starvation, and modern neologisms), and usually the -tion word in French are from Latin, but not always. (sometimes you can have a "tion" words that came through old French or French and doesn't exist in Latin in the "tio" form, for instance "aviation".)

To remember it's feminine, you can picture yourself a girl reading a lesson, or remember this expression "lectio divina", and you won't forget again it's feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's the same in Spanish with nouns that end in -ción.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

Look at the nominative lectio. It's a SOX word. That is to say it ends in S, O or X. (O in this case obviously.) In the 3rd declension, which this is, and the 3rd is by far the largest declension, SOX words tend to be feminine.

Lectio doesn't mean "chapter" by the way. According to my Oxford Latin Dictionary it's:

  1. The action of gathering
  2. The action of picking, choosing, selecting
  3. A reading, perusal
  4. That which is read, reading-matter; a passage in a book, text; (pl. as the title of a book) readings.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stevet44

"Many chapters are in the book", while not actually grammatically wrong, is a very stilted English translation.
"There are many chapters in the book" is more natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maddox996594

It shuold be there are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It *can be "There are many chapters in the book."

"Many chapters are in the book" is at least as good a translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

How is "multi" different from "multae"? Anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

In this case it's the masculine nominative plural, multi, verses the feminine nominative plural, multae. Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

As a further clarification, lectio is a feminine noun, 3rd declension. The nominative plural is lectiones. The adjective, needing to agree in gender, number and case, needs to be feminine, plural and nominative. Multus, -a, -um is the adjective in question and is multae in the feminine, plural, nominative. Hope that that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosQI_

I wrote "There are many lessons in the book" and got it wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

Lectio doesn't mean lesson. It doesn't really mean chapter either, but that's another matter. See my answer earlier in the discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

This is what i mean! 'Libro'

In the lesson I see, 'Liber' nom sg, 'librum' acc sg, 'libri' nom pl, and 'libros' acc pl.... Where did Libro even come from? Am I supposed to just know what form thats in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2612

You can definitely get the lesson notes on the website. On the app, it might depend whether you're iOS or Android. I don't see it on Android.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

This was EXTREMELY helpful!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

Why isnt it 'Librum'? Why is it in Dative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

Or is it Ablative? that makes a bit more sense. As the chapters are held by the book. Is that it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2612

It's the ablative. It just happens to be the same form as the dative. It's locational.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

Is 'The book has many chapters.' also a valid rendering?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkahn400

As a loose translation I would say yes, but for these exercises it's better to stick with a more literal rendering. So either "many chapters are in the book" or "there are many chapters in the book".

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