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"Corinna studies Latin literature."

Translation:Corinna litteris Latinis studet.

August 30, 2019

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenMoe4

Am I wrong to assume that litteris Latinis should mean the same thing as Latinis litteris?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

Why litteris Latinis? Why Dat/Abl and not Acc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

It is the dative. The verb Studere usually takes an object in the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

Thank you for the answer. I hope I do not forget it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

"Litteras Latinas" was also accepted. Are they the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

No, that's the wrong case and it ought not to have accepted that. "Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to" and therefore takes the dative case, which for this declension is "litteris Latinis".

"Litteras Latinas" is the accusative and would be used if the verb were "legere" (to read) or "discere" (to learn) or "scribere" (to write).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iongantas

Nice how they just threw that in there before telling us anything about it. The lesson I'm on discusses accusative, but I haven't gotten to dative yet, and they just toss that in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saskia777

And why do we need the plural here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metlieb

Because littera in singular means "letter", while in plural it means "literature".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Seems like in French (and maybe in some other languages):

Étudier la littérature (Study literature) = Étudier les lettres -(literally Study "letters")

Avoir des lettres (literally: to have letters) = to have a good culture in literature and humanities.

When it's singular, lettre, it's always a mail, or an alphabet letter. When it's plural, it's mail, alphabet, or literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

Yeah, it's the same in Portuguese: for example two of the major academic fields are "ciências" (sciences) and "letras" ("letters").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saskia777

Thank you - then it's plausible. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nnullness

Is "Cronna studet litteris latinis" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

It's unusual. The standard sequence is Subject Object Verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

This section is so confusing. All these words changing all over the place now and it makes me feel like I have missed a lesson or two somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

You can definitely get the lesson notes on the website. On the app, it might depend whether you're iOS or Android. I don't see it on Android.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aeneas782551

Why is it 'litteris latinis' and not 'litteris latinae'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2613

"Studere" is literally "to dedicate oneself to" and therefore takes the dative instead of the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelBel419582

What does that mean (i.e. taking the dative instead of the accusative)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

Start with this: A plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33852818/Magistra-Corinna-litteras-Latinas-legit
Here, "legit" is a transitive verb and "litteras Latinas" is its direct object. So "legere" takes the accusative.

The term "dative" comes from the Latin "dare", "to give".
Da mihi olivas.
Give to-me (dative) olives (accusative).

"Studere" is dedicating oneself (implied accusative) to a thing (dative).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffyus

Why use plural form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2613

It's literally "letters" as in the letters of the alphabet. But in the plural it can mean "literature", because literature is created by writing letters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xuu37

I will never understand why they don't just mention the verbs and the corresponding cases. And the corresponding declination. I need to dive through discussion pages to find out what case this is and then deduct how that declination works.

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