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  5. "Many universities are in Rom…

"Many universities are in Rome."

Translation:Multae universitates Romae sunt.

August 30, 2019

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe977604

I am never sure when to use the word 'in'. This time no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The locative case is used with the names of towns, cities, small islands, and the words "rus" (farm/countryside), "humus" (ground), and "domus" (house/home).

Everything else takes a preposition plus the ablative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimACRowden

I see ”multi” used for ”many men” (masc pl). Here it is ”multae” (implying fem pl) for ”universities”.

How does one 'know' the gender of a noun? Is there a rule like the -o or -a ending in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The safer for beginners is to always learn the noun with its gender, like in French.

We consider the nominative:

Often nouns ending with "a" are feminine, but it's not always the case: poeta, nauta, agricola.
But the plural of neutral words also ends with "a", and they are neutral, not feminine. So be careful.

"us" are often masculine.
"um" are often neutral.

I don't know for the exceptions.

I believe (as a beginner) words ending with "ex" are rather masculine (but index can be either masculine (the index of the hand) or feminine (a register), maybe other exceptions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Virus, viri (a virus) neutral. Pharmaceuta, pirata, etc. (either masculine or feminine depending on the person it describes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saskia777

Is there a rule when to use "Romae" as a locative or "in Roma" as a ablative construction?

In this case 'Multae universitates in Roma sunt' was marked incorrect ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

I believe in this course I've only ever encountered "Romae" (contrasting with "in Italia"), so I simply thought you couldn't have "in Roma".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saskia777

In the meantime, I read in another discussion that the locative is used for cities, but that you must apply the ablative for countries and states.

Thus: Romae, Bostoniae, ...

in Italia, in California, ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

For cities/towns, and small island,
and a few word like domus, rus, and humus = only the locative (so without "in")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nnikolov30

Educatio est mater scientiae!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeckinMeme

The magic 'in' just shows up wherever it wants to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

The locative case is used with the names of towns, cities, small islands, and the words "rus" (farm/countryside), "humus" (ground), and "domus" (house/home).

Everything else takes a preposition plus the ablative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cervido

With macrons (cf. Wiktionary):

Multae ūniversitātēs Rōmae sunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Archoss

Does the sentence always have to follow the same structure?

Would 'Multae universitates sunt Romae' not work equally as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

When "esse/to be" is involved, the verb can come last or it can come between the subject and the complement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enrico438513

In all the other languages I'm learning so far, I'm getting lessons on how and when to say things from the discussion forums, but Duolingo itself should have it, like in Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drk_Dlng

why not universitates multae? multae is an adj. right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

Adjectives can come before the noun, especially when they relate to quantity/amount.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enrico438513

Latin and Italian lesson on Duolingo suck in that there are no guides or instructions or tips on grammar, no rules, or principles to help one decide when to say what....so far, only Spanish has that, and it's very helpful in the Spanish lessons...whoever is contributing the content could learn a thing or two from the Spanish contributors


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoralLorna

Why is the multi word end with an i instead of an ae please? Im sure universities are feminine ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

It is Multae universitates Romae sunt. I don't know where you saw that it was "multi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

Lol-I put Romae up a few times, just to hear him say it! It sounded like dealing cards!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David261735

So a person in or at a place gets in. But a landmark or building in a place doesnt. I think...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skinny56512

This the second week in a row that I have started in the top three with, say, 60 points. Two minutes later when I have completed a practice lesson and now have 80 points, I see that someone who wasn't on the board two minutes ago is now at the top with 500 points. There's something not right here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

I thought that adjectives and the nouns they modify were supposed to receive the same declension. Why is it not "multae universitae" or "multates universitates"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

Adjectives have their own declensions. They only agree in number, gender, and case.

EDIT: I don't mean there are declensions for nouns and separate declensions for adjectives. I just mean an adjective's declension is what it is. It does not change to match the declension of its noun (although there are certainly times when the adjective's declension just happens to be the same as the noun's).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/triklogl

What is wrong with "Romae sunt multae universitates", Please?!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colleen289785

I had multae and then I thought because universitas was 3rd. fem, I changed it to multes as the plural. nom. to agree with the noun ....confused again!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

Here is the declension chart for "multus":

Masc-S Masc-Pl Fem-S Fem-Pl Neut-S Neut-Pl
NOM multus multi multa multae multum multa
GEN multi multorum multae multarum multi multorum
DAT multo multis multae multis multo multis
ACC multum multos multam multas multum multa
ABL multo multis multa multis multo multis
VOC multe multi multa multae multum multa

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/adjective:multus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoralLorna

Universities in America end with an I . Universities in Rome end with ae . Or so it seems? I got it wrong by using ae in American universities . Is the ending of "many " multi or Multae ? Universities are feminine are they not ? Or does it change from country to country ? Yours in confusion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

The location of the university has nothing to do with it. However, it does matter if we're saying where it is vs what's in it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayRay71625

Without having to also study what is meant by "locative case, preposition, and ablative case etc.." lets just say you should use "in" for all cases except in front of names of cities,towns,islands, and the words humus and rus. Latin is hard enough as it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2605

You're not going to get very far in Latin if you don't learn what the cases are called.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation

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