"Quot fratres habes?"

Translation:How many brothers do you have?

August 30, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

Nobody:

Me: Both frater and brother (and many others) come from the (reconstructed) Proto-Indoeuropean bʰréh₂tēr.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

I appreciate this. Do enjoy a good etymology tidbit.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I love etymology. The words in English and in Latin have same ancestors, the English doesn't come directly from the Latin root.

Old English broþor, Proto-Germanic brothar
All from PIE root bhrater-.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varkentje123

English does have many words directly from Latin though, probably via French.

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Latin was widely used in English monasteries before the influx of French in 1066. Quite a few words have been there for well over a thousand years (although the majority are later arrivals).

ETA: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Old_English_terms_borrowed_from_Latin

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's not the same thing. Varkentje is right, English is not a Latin language, it's because English has been heavily influenced by French, and French being a Latin language, that it has acquired most of its Latin roots.

Latin has been used in monasteries in many Christian countries, and it didn't influence directly the language, for instance, in Germany.

If you compare the English language before the influx of French and after, it's a totally different language.

The law, religious, and medical vocabularies, are directly from Latin, as Latin was the law and science universal language, went directly from Latin to English, but they are very very few in comparaison of all the French roots in English. English language is the descend of French, as well of the descend of Saxon, it's the reason why it get its vocabulary from Anglo-Frisian, Saxon.. and Latin-French, and its grammatical structure and syntax purely from the Anglo-Frisian family, not Latin.

See, only in you comment, there is already several French words borrowed. "monastery" from French "monastère", and the French from Latin.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/monastery

Arrival, from arriver. Majority from majorité (it's a common pattern, when it's "té" in French, it became "ty" in English), influx from the French influx. Remove the borrowed words, you'll remove most of the Latin presence in English.

September 18, 2019, 1:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Perce, no need to tell me: I have an MA in Medieval English. :) But it is an interesting topic, and I am sure others will enjoy it, too. But: English has not, neither through French nor any other way, acquired Latin roots. Its roots are undisputedly Germanic, and it has merely acquired a (sizable) number of Latinate lexemes (in many ways and over many centuries) -- or, to stay with the tree imagery, has grafted Latin/French branches.

it didn't influence directly the language, for instance, in Germany.

But how it has influenced German! Very ancient Latin loans in German seem so very "native" that we don't even notice them, for example Fenster , Pferd and even Kopf! (English, on the other hand, preserves "original" Germanic forms with window , horse and head .)

Yes, English massively changed after the Norman Conquest, but it didn't change just by borrowing heavily and taking a lot of loan words: The very structure of the language changed, and the syntax became drastically more analytic, thus prompting more "radical" linguists to even speak of a creolisation process (this is a bit too extreme to be widely accepted, but there likely are a few grains of truth to it). So, again, while English is certainly a Germanic language, its syntax isn't exactly typical of the family.

I don't mean to negate the amount of borrowing from French into English; it is massive. It's simply not true that that is where English has all its Latin from. There were earlier influences in pre-Norman times (like candle or castle, for example), and most modern familiar "scientific Latin" terms are much more recent and in some cases didn't even exist in Classical Latin but where coined for modern scientific usage (cf. the discussion on Americanus/-a a few sentences away from this. :))

September 18, 2019, 3:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

this is an American English translation. English English is have you. This is not accepted

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

As a native English English speaker, I prefer "do you have"

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

that is still an American English structure

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I learnt at school "Have you got.." always this the "got", I don't know why.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

Ah well, in my Grammar School, we were penalised for using the word got.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

It's funny how the kind of language that is considered worth teaching is just as much subject to fashion as everything else is. :)

On Duolingo, I always find it sad when people squabble about whose variety is better, older, more correct or more prestigious. This is one of the very few instances where I see people just comparing notes, as it were, without insisting the other alternative should be considered wrong. Thank you for that. :)

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karol_Gherard

In English six words, in Latin only three.

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD
  • 1532

Be nice if you could clearly distinguish whether they say "habes" or "habent" because when this female speaks she often descends on sound distinction where you need it the most.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

I wholeheartedly agree. Sometimes I listen five or six times and am still not sure what is being said. There are times when I can use what grammar I know to decide... others, I just guess.

September 14, 2019
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