"Ego in insula habito."

Translation:I live in an apartment building.

August 30, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RegDodds

"Insula" is also an island.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

In fact 'island' is the more common meaning. I think it is a pedagogical error to introduce a new word with one of its arcane meanings. Back in the day my grade 9 Latin textbook started with the sentence: "Britannia est insula".

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

All of the textbooks I have encountered start with the 'insula' which has its literal meaning 'island' like 'Italia non est insula'. Textbooks love this word because they can use it to introduce the first declension. I don't understand why they introduce such a simple word with its less common but more complex meaning, as well as, promoting the rare locative case as the first lesson.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouiviVeterus

It was very common to refer to apartments as 'insulae' in Roman times.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlistairLy1

Acceptability of translating "insula" as "insula"? From my {stupid, uneducated} understanding, insulae were a particular and somewhat distinctive type of housing.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Typically a lodging house for poor people, with several apartments. Could also refer to a single apartment in such a building. 'Lodging house' should be accepted at least.

August 30, 2019
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