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  5. "Senex iuvenem vehementer pul…

"Senex iuvenem vehementer pulsat."

Translation:The old man hits the young man violently.

August 31, 2019

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toms662174

He said "Ok boomer". It was worth the price.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tc2018
  • 1041

Oh no, I'd only just got used to the destruction of the parrots!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laci300660

"Vehementer" - I translated it "vehemently", and it was not accepted. I think there is a word "vehemently" in English. Surely there is. Not accepting it is just stupid. See ANY Latin-English dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeminaVexilla

I came here to ask "what's wrong with The old man hits the young man vehemently?" -- Lewis & Short s.v. vehementer gives "Eagerly, impetuously, ardently, violently, earnestly, vehemently, etc."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Clearly, it should be considered a fine translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HugoFragata

"The old man violently hits the young man" was not accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please, just report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vero_n

"Strikes" should be a correct translation for "pulsat" as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riverocks452

why are 'elder' and 'youth' unaccepable translations of senex and iuvenis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

In terms of Latin, they are fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrankoDuo

Lately I see sentences similar to this one "The old man hits the young man violently." Before that there were the whole bunch about destroying this or that. Can't the course creator think of some more inspiring and nicer sentences!? Maybe the old an could help the younger one? What do you think? To much violence these days around anyway. Not necessary to drill it in Latin course too, having in mind all great sources in Latin literary works or myths. Thank you for understanding,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Well, we need to be able to talk about violence in Latin, as well; which is why we are also learning about thieves and hiding. The old Pagan Romans were also exceptionally violent, themselves. Maybe we could talk more about transubstantiation, instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

Oh! These parrots were influential as well!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

Why though? Why are we learning how to say this instead of stopping the old creep?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

Honest answer: when people vecome senile, like with Parkinson's or Alzheimers or other dimentias, its not uncommon for them to suddenly become aware of where they are and if it is not the same place they were the last time they had awareness, it freaks them out and they get scared and like most any creature that is freaked out, they have a tendancy to strike out at whoever is nearest. It's sadly not uncommon for a 'lost' senile person to hit and with the adrenaline from not knowing where one is and/or how they got there, they can hit hard! Its also fairly normal to not realize then or later that they hurt a loved one or care taker or sometimes an innocent bystander. Thats part of why CNAs and others that work in senior demwntia living facilities arent paid enough. Imagine going to work, knowing some old person might just punch you right in the face, and not even getting a decent wage! I assumed you were seriously asking. I knownalot of the comments at the end of this course are silly and joking, so I thought since there's actual truth behind this one, unlike throwing fish on the floor or putting up with exotic drunken birds, I answered you seriously. Even if you were joking! .
. The more you know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honcongensis

Forcefully' should also be accepted forvehementer'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

HOW DO YOU DO! MY NAME IS SUE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Can't use "punches" for pulsat, apparently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arbuscula

There are great discounts in the local store.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arbuscula

It is shopping madness on Black Friday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NatalieMos889766

The sweet violence on this course makes me laugh))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laci300660

Vehementer rides? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria356865

Why is vigorously not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimatter162

this is just child abuse now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Do we know, for sure, that the young feller didn't do something to 'deserve' it ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

1) He hit a young man, not a boy. .
2) sometimes old people with dementia hit other people, hard. Usually when they are scared of frustrated. It sucks but it happens!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesHamil261469

Why not "the old man violently punches the young man"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria356865

I imagine he's hitting him with his stick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes: Eum baculō verberat .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virpacalis

Ethics aside, why not also "... hits the young lady ...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awawe1

Why is "The old man violently hits the juvenile" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth305273

What would young lady be? How come it is always the young men?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Is it English to say "the old man violently hits the young"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I would interpret that as meaning that the old man makes a regular practice of hitting a whole class of persons = "the young." So, it's not a translation of this sentence.

But you could say, "The old man violently hits the young one," which avoids the repetition of the word "man."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diocletian101

can sopmebody explain to me why the -r is there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Sure! Some adverbs end in -ē; these are derived from 1st/2nd declension adjectives. For example, "wide" is the adj. lātus, a, um ; "widely" (as in "far and wide") is the adv. lātē . This is a regular process. Other adverbs, derived from 3rd declension adjectives, end either in -iter or in -er. An adjective like dulcis, is, e "sweet" makes the adverb dulciter "sweetly." So also ferōx, ferōcis "fierce" and ferōciter "fiercely." But if the adjective's BASE ends in -nt- , then the adverb is formed by adding -er rather than -iter: for example, vehemēns, vehementis , "violent", and adverb vehementer , "violently." (So also prūdēns, prūdentis , "wise" and adv. prūdenter , "wisely.")

There are also plenty of adverbs not derived from adjectives, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria356865

I'll have a large lātē please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diocletian101

thank you so much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YoonsunC

Should the adverb be before the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That's the unmarked, normal position, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.saraaaaaa.

The word "pulsat" is pronounced with excessive English / American accent. I don't see the point in adding listening exercises if you don't have anyone capable of pronouncing it correctly. Which is understandable, given that Latin is a dead language and no one needs to understand or speak it in its oral form - the listening exercises are even more useless under this light. Like, I appreciate the effort, but...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/els976518

The order is not important and not a mistake either

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