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"The parrot is greedy for your gems."

Translation:Psittacus gemmas tuas concupiscit.

August 31, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markandrew

Wouldn't the English word covet work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

imho the best translation of concupiscere is "crave". "covet" in KJV of biblical commandments seems to imply a conscious choice as "thou shalt not covet" thy neighbor's wife or stuff. (guess it was ok to covet someone's husband though.) "is greedy for" sounds stilted as does "tries to grab". i begrudingly use these kinds of words & expressions just because i am greedy for and try to grab the completion of a lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christie636016

Concupiscit can mean greedy, but the adjective avarum works also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaxDeum

Yes, 'avarus' is similar, the English word 'avaricious' kinda covers it :) And it requires genitivus [obiectivus]. In my opinion, 'avarus' has a negative connotation, while 'concupiscit' emphasizes the strive for the gems. So, different shades :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I do agree, maybe "avariter velit" or "cupide velit"?

I don't know which one is the better in this context. "avariter" or "cupide".

https://www.etymonline.com/word/avaricious


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

Being "avarum" means "not being willing to give"; "concupire" (I guess that's the infinitive) is closer to "craving".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaxDeum

Inf: concupīscere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcalonso

Of course, allways those parrots :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franz460815

When they are sober, they're dishonest...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jyssi

I'm starting do get quite scared of them, especially when they are drunk and hurling spears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VesperEule

First they lure you in with their sweet singing, then next thing you know, your gems are gone!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dawn940425

Have you ever heard a parrot? Sweet??!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/memoryLang

Why tuas not tuus?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaxDeum

Because gemmas is in Plural Accusative (gemma, -ae f -> I. declinatio) and 'tuus' must be in the same case when you say "your gems". And why is it 'gemmas'? Because 'concupisco' (meaning 'covet') requires Accusative.

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