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  5. "Tu psittacos aestimas."

"Tu psittacos aestimas."

Translation:You appraise the parrots.

August 31, 2019

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMoogle

Do drunk parrots sell for more or less than sober parrots? Since there are so many sentences about drunk parrots I have to know now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suzanwatson

Of course they sell for less. There are no worse animals. They are known for their entanglements with the Deceitful Old Men. They can only be destroyed by fire. Best to avoid them altogether.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

I bet you a clever weasel could defeat them. And then persuade you to pay extra for them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

Drunken parrots command a premium in this market. Angry drunken parrots even more so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

They're also deceitful, so they can't be worth much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

But they do write songs...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cquark

I really can't imagine that these drunk, deceitful parrots are worth all that much.

Then again they can be used to teach Latin. Hmm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexterAndre

Perhaps drunk parrots can read?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Fortasse psittaci ebrii legere possunt...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quintley

Hmmm...irati sunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christos970882

Aestimare previously was translated as estimate/appraise. So why "you estimate the parrots is wrong"? It could refer to someone making an estimate of how many parrots, or how well fed they are etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Because you estimate a value, and you appraise a living being.

The "how many parrots" won't work if you don't explain what you are evaluating. "Estimating" asks about a number value, but you cannot say "I evaluate my children" to mean what you count them. This needs to be said and not implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dana843960

Should they be appraised or roadside evaluated for blood alcohol content?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suzanwatson

Brilliant. I've got the Coronavirus Quarantine Blues, and you just made my day! Have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schnueffi

You appraise the parrots, but you kill them, too...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

No! Don't do that! They're drunk and deceitful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Or we could specify: "Please consider this in your appraisal of them."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

What is the dieefence between “aestimo” and “aestumo”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Alternative form, according to Wiktionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

Why is "You estimate the parrots." wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/estimate

If you estimate a quantity or value, you make an approximate judgment or calculation of it.

So, they use it only with "pretium/pretia", not beings.

If you appraise something or someone, you consider them carefully and form an opinion about them.

So it's applicable to beings (animals or human beings)

Notice that both appraise and estimate have the meaning of "considering carefully to form an opinion about it", but one is used for values, and prices, and the other one for living beings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Possibly because, although it's a grammatically correct English sentence, it's not at all obvious what it actually means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, I've been wondering about this, too. Are "you" (the appraiser) the one deciding on how much to charge for the parrots you're selling; or are you the buyer, deciding how much it's worth paying out for them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MEELOOSH

What does appraise mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quintley

Evaluate, guess the worth of, guess how much of a threat something is, that kind of thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaikoV_V

How can someone think of selling those same parrots that wrote songs, that got drunk with you, that you wouldn't hit even if they were angry. Parrots are friends, not commodity #ServaPsittacos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimork

I don't seem to have any "Tips" for this level, and therefore no new vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro177810

Yes, I think it's a mistake (glitch). Or perhaps the new vocabulary is quite simple. There isn't new grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro177810

Actually, there's new grammar: 'aestimare vult'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

A verb that requires a "complementary infinitive" to complete its meaning (verbs such as want, don't want, am able, am afraid, am accustomed to, prepare may introduce an infinitive to complete the meaning).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrenReiley

I think we all need to appraise the parrots after this course. I'll never look at one the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dietrevich

The word should be esteem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

So, you mean, "You think highly of the parrots," since that's what "esteem" means ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dietrevich

Yes, as in have in high regard, valued, etc. In Spanish and Italian we still use the word for both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It's used that way in English, too. Looks like Latin aestimare had a much bigger range. ("Holding parrots in high regard" seems funny to me--as opposed to esteeming war heroes, or great artists, or others who've accomplished something!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dietrevich

Well, it isn't any weirder than talking about angry drunk parrots.. at least some pet lovers may agree with the sentiment. ;) BTW. The connotation in English is not quite the same as in the romance languages. It's a bit more nuanced and it includes animals, on top of being an everyday word unlike inEnglish

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