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  5. "لَيْسَ عِنْد جودي مِعْطَف بُ…

"لَيْسَ عِنْد جودي مِعْطَف بُنِّيّ وَأَزْرَق."

Translation:Judy does not have a brown and blue coat.

August 31, 2019

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tahsin777

So it is أَزْرَق because coat is masculine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bombadillo

I said blue and brown and I don't get the point?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Usually in Duolingo (in any language) the order of the adjectives (even if there is "and" between them) is important and must be followed. As a native I can say here that you can say (blue and brown) or (brown and blue) - the two are equal. But from experience I know that Duolingo wouldnt accept (sometimes) any answer; It all depends on the contributors really and what model answers did they feed the system with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thank you. Also, if you get the order wrong (as I did at first) it could be because you had muddled the two Arabic adjectives (which I had). We have only just learnt them!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Also, I had carefully noted the difference you kindly gave us between the masculine and feminine of "white", namely that the masculine began with alif-glottal stop, and the feminine ended with Alif and glottal stop, but the word for "brown" doesn't seem to follow that rule. I must have extrapolated the wrong rule. What is the rule, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Well, I didn't learn any rule for that but this is just my observation about the colors in Arabic:

In Arabic, there are "basic" colors, and I would claim that these basic colors are the spectrum colors + black and white. These colors follow the first version (masculine begins with Alif, feminine ends with Alif-glottal). So: Red, Yellow, Green, Blue, Black, White.
I know I've skipped some colors, but I've skipped them for a reason; They fall under the second category.

The second category of colors, I'd say, is where you find colors NAMED after common things. The color names under this category are simply derivatives of the nouns they come from (by adding the "relation Y" to its end, namely ـي). Adding the "relation Y" (Arabic: ياء النسبة) is a common way of forming an adjective out of a noun, somehow like in English where we have -ic or -al and so on. Many colors fall under this class:

  • Orange: برتقالي (burtuqáliy), from برتقال (burtuqál), the orange fruit.
  • Gray: رمادي (ramádiy), from رماد (ramád), Ash.
  • Brown: بنّي (bunniy), from بُن (bun), coffee bean.
  • Pink: وردي (wardiy), from ورد (ward), roses.
  • Pink(2): زهري (zahriy), from زهر (zahr), flowers.

Just to note here, I've included the two common words used for (Pink) but probably they are varying in degrees (could be one color is lighter than the other) but I've seen many books use the term in Pink(2) rather than in Pink. I think it's an artistic preference maybe, I'm not sure.
And here, with the second class, we deal with such color names like we do with regular adjectives; We would add Ta-marbútah for the feminine version of the color name.

So, in a nutshell, I would say that some colors are purely abstract in some sense, and those are the basic colors and they follow the rule: أ for masculine and ـاء for feminine , while the second class are colors that are more attached to known objects and their names formed by virtue of deriving and adjective from that object, and this class in terms of gender are treated just like any adjective.
Hope this clears it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

This is wonderful. Thank you. I'll set aside some time to read and re-read it. And it makes perfect sense, and is very satisfying. May I repay in a small way? What you wrote clears it up, not out. To clear out is to get rid of things, as opposed to clear up = make them tidy / clear / comprehensible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rrehan

Can you please recommend me such Arabic grammer books?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suzan502737

That's so interesting! Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Hello, Rrehan. About grammar books. I've had one recommended to me, called All the Arabic you never learned the first time around. I found the introduction a bit forbidding (online), but I've had a look at the text, and it's MARVELLOUS. It explains things very simply, and in a friendly, humorous way. It's written for an American audience, but that doesn't seem to matter at all. The author is so intelligent and human. You can access it at: http://allthearabicyouneverlearnedthefirsttimearound.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/All-The-Arabic-Searchable-PDF.pdf Unfortunately, the URL says "Not Secure", and I'm not sure what the risk is, if any. I've also looked for it on sale, but it seems to cost just under 100 dollars.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

haha thanks for the clarification :)

Maybe next time I should use (hope this clarifies things) instead to avoid prepositional phrases :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

(: ههههه


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

I'm sure you shouldn't avoid prepositional phrases! Though I believe they can be complicated for non native speakers. They're so illogical!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Sorry, I don't know any such books, but I can tell you that grammar is not spelled grammer. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Well, I believe every language does have this kind of "illogical" stuff, and probably it is "illogical" only on the temporal plane (i.e. it made sense for ancient people because it meant something but the meaning of the phrase changed over time and people kept using it).
I'm kind of used to such confusion by now I guess, specially after delving into German and Russian (and specially German where the preposition is part of the verb altogether and this is how you are supposed to look it up in the dictionary, with the preposition).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Eressea

WHAT prepositions part of WHICH verbs (in German)? this language never ceases to amaze me :O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kobold83015

eg. aufgehen, untergehen, übergehen, etwas angehen ...

all have different meanings but stem from the verb gehen (to go)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Decybele

I noticed that too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanne918432

the word for brown sounds female to me. is it for grammatical reasons or is it just a fault?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

It's a mistake actually. It should be Bunniyyun (and mi3Tafun as well).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

Wow, some really interesting posts here! I just got on to ask if anybody else felt like they were giving police descriptions in this lesson! ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Eressea

it's an intensive introduction to what is thought to be stylish.... blue and brown together, better a blouse for us womenfolk (T-Shirts are only for Seth) and always have a scarf :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Afyman123

The course forgot about fish and chicken so fast. Rip Samak and Rajaaj


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Dajaaj - دجاج


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GunawanWib438779

What is the differences between DOES NOT and DOESN'T ????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Welcome to Duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pszemekkk

It accepts it for me, it just gives "another correct answer" but I get the point. Maybe you had something else wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

absolutely nothing, as far as meaning goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Sophia_Eressea: Sorry had to make a new thread here because the reply button disappeared.
Not sure if you are German or not but anyway, many verbs in German to have the preposition as part of the verb and it is detached when it is used, like for example angeben (specify), and many verbs starting with an-; Such verbs would detach an- and put it at the end of the sentence: I specify becomes ich gebe an... and so on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Eressea

ah, that you are referring to as prepositions :) thank you for even opening up a new thread, have a lingot for your efforts :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Bitte schön


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Foutch1

Then again, wo does?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HildegardK20

Was ist falsch????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rex.Galilae

Wait she doesn't? How DARE SHE LIE TO ME!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaleemulla484844

My answer is right but not accepted. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

we have to see your answer to see what went wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnE385418

This answer is correct too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

Rrehan: unfortunately, as i am a native speaker and we learn it in schools, i don't really have a book for Arabic grammar dedicated to foreigners. Nor I have books in Arabic as well, as I surf the net sometimes if I'm doubtful about some of my info


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolmazHasa1

Again you took my answer wrong . Why i can use does not and doesn't too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suzan502737

In Duolingo I notice they like you to completely spell the words : does not . Doesn't has the same meaning but it's a contraction. Doesn't is not accepted everywhere in all circumstances. For example, you would not use doesn't in a formal academic paper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

It depends on the contributors really. In other courses here I even type "dont" for "don't" and it is still OK. Maybe with a note of a typo, but the answer is not rejected. So, it seems this is something related to the course contributors here rather than a general system of Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolmazHasa1

Why you make so My answer correct. Quite correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

does not = doesn't

Duolingo sometimes have a problem in the system because contributors do not feed the system with every possible answer/translation.
So, sometimes using (doesn't) or (does not) is correct for both, or wrong for one of them and not the other. So, it's not a language thing. It's a system (data base) problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

Some of the languages do a better job of it than others though, so I think it IS a contributor thing. For instance, Spanish will accept all kinds of variations, but Vietnamese will only accept stilted variations EXACTLY, even if in previous sentences in the same lesson they said it a different way! One thing I really appreciate about the Arabic lessons is that most of the sentences have the spoken version to hear. One thing I wish they would change is to put more emphasis on VOCABULARY, and less on individual letters and phonemes. Almost all of the reviews center on the letters and phonemes, whereas I really need help expanding my vocabulary and verb tenses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1384

I hear it is still in beta. So, I don't know if it will get any better later.

The audio recorded is machine-based and not spoken by a real person. There is a great deal of errors in the spoken sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arshaan413061

Right answer is matching with my answer but show red color and wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarakSaltz

مِعْطَف

cognate of the Hebrew: לעטוף to wrap; מעטפה envelope


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maryammir10

Why you take my mestak

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