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  5. "Plurimi pisces tibi placent."

"Plurimi pisces tibi placent."

Translation:You like very many fish.

August 31, 2019

49 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cheyne

"very many" needs to be dropped. (Please see my more substantive comments on this topic elsewhere in this lesson.) It's not okay. And I'm going to keep posting comments until it's fixed because DL staff not only hasn't corrected this but is arguing with people. I've never seen anything like this in any other DL course. Please don't be convinced otherwise. You should not be using the phrase "very many" in English. There are a plethora of better options


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

Yes, I like "a plethora" of fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26
  • 1044

Or multitudes? "a large number of people or things."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

I will try to explain. This is comparative usage of an adjective, so it is much like the -er, -est endings in English. The degrees go as follows: multus, -a, -um (many); plus, pluris (more); and plurimus, -a, -um (most). The above are direct translations; however, when we say "this is the best!" in English, for example, we don't always mean it literally.

Therein lies the caveat.

The superlative degree in Latin accounts for hyperbole in that it can mean "Most" or "Very."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

As this sentences clearly refers many instances (or types) of fish, rather than a large quantity of fish, 'fishes' should be accepted, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alessia120502

Fish is plural of fish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

Fish is plural of fish except when we talk about several different species of fish. In this case, fishes is the plural form. I think that in this case fishes should be accepted, particularly because it makes much more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"A very large amount" would be better than the awkward "very many" in my opinion. (Edit: But, it's good English, because Oxford uses it)
In addition, it wouldn't be ambiguous like this sentence is, about the 2 meanings of fish/fishes, meaning a large amount of fish, or several kinds of fishes.

Plurimi is translated by "a large amount":
https://www.lexilogos.com/latin/gaffiot.php?q=plurimi (in French)
so, what is the problem?
(Also, in some contexts: the biggest amount: possible or available amount. As a superlative.)

I see that Wiktionary used "very many" too:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/plurimus
but with an uncountable, it's just more confusion.

Edit: A very/really large amount is better than A large amount, since there's a superlative here.

muti << plurimi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomCook887477

I'm going to come out against the naysayers - I use "very many" in this sense (I'm a native English speaker, brought up speaking Australian English but living in the UK for many years). It's an unusual construction and one I would only use for emphatic effect.

A Google Ngram search shows that it is somewhat archaic, being very much more used in the 19th century than the 20th or 21st. A books search shows that most usages are not negative, either in the 19th or 20th century, and that usage is typically in academic rather than popular literature.

Start here for the data: https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=very+many&smoothing=3&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cvery%20many%3B%2Cc0#t1%3B%2Cvery%20many%3B%2Cc1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silicon54

What is the reason "You like the very many fish" is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrG33

Very many fish please you. Will this be accepted? Educated native English speakers' comment will be appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CynthiaAll13

I am a native speaker of English who is also a linguist who has studied like vs. please in the history of English. A difference between like and please is that like talks about an emotional attitude. You don't really have to have a reason for liking something. But you do have to have a reason why something pleases you. So it is odd to say 'John pleases me' by itself, whereas it is natural to say 'I like John'. Someone can ask you why you like John and you can say 'I don't know, I just like him'. But you can say either 'I like the plan' or 'the plan pleases me'. If it pleases you you are likely to go on to say what you think is good about the plan. So after this long and turgid explanation, my final statement is that the fish is unlikely to please you--it hasn't done anything to earn your approval. But you might say it if you take it as evidence that your wife has gone to some effort to get the fish and prepare it, for example. I hope this makes sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluePrinc

very many fish or very many fishes?? It looks here plural would be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

Both "fish" and "fishes" are the plural of "fish", depending on what you're talking about.

"Fish" is the plural most of the time. It's only "fishes" when referring to plural species or populations of fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

I will try to explain. This is comparative usage of an adjective, so it is much like the -er, -est endings in English. The degrees go as follows: multus, -a, -um (many); plus, pluris (more); and plurimus, -a, -um (most). The above are direct translations; however, when we say "this is the best!" in English, for example, we don't always mean it literally.

Therein lies the caveat.

The superlative degree in Latin accounts for hyperbole in that it can mean "Most" or "Very."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vongraff

Shouldn't the verb be "placas" for a second person subject?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

"Tu" is not the subject. Notice how "tibi" is in the dative case.

It is literally "Very many fish are pleasing to you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

There is nothing wrong with "very many".

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/many

We can modify many with very, a great or so:

Very many people have complained about the situation.
There were a great many questions which were left unanswered at the end of the investigation.
Why do so many people watch reality TV shows?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

"You like very many fish" cannot be right. You do not like, the fish please. If it was "Tu plurimos pisces amas," the "you" is doing the liking. Here, it is the "fish" that are doing the pleasing. It should be "very many fish please you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

Yes, the Latin is literally "Many fish are pleasing to you." But translation is not about going literally word-for-word. It is about taking what is said in language A and rendering it the way it is said in language B. Different languages say things differently. It is not idiomatic in English to say "Many fish are pleasing to you" but it is idiomatic to say "You like many fish."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyChil9

Placent means "they like" not "you like."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

No. It means "they are pleasing". That's where the "tibi" comes in. Literally "A great many fish are pleasing to you."

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