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  5. "Corinna et Livia iter faciun…

"Corinna et Livia iter faciunt."

Translation:Corinna and Livia make a journey.

August 31, 2019

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ISpeakAlien

Is there a non-literal translation that makes more sense? "Making a journey" does not sound very natural...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

"Corinna and Livia are going on a journey."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusieODrangus

They aren't accepting that right now though. Only "make a journey"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjbaroff

As of 11/5/19 they are accepting "Corinna and Livia are on a journey" which is much more natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's very natural in non-US English, at least.

Cambridge says it's perfectly good English, for instance. So I think it is.

Oxford has the same opinion:
https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/travel#travel__3

But in English, like in every other languages, there are regional differences.

And also, there's a difference in the meaning between trip and journey, they aren't interchangeable:
https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/travel-trip-or-journey-/4785776.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamsterDra

I think the reason they said "make a journey" is because that is used often in old Latin Literature. There are lots of things like this that sound weird at first but become notmal after youve Latin for awhile.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjbaroff

I don't think most people are confused by the Latin, but by the English. While "make a journey" isn't unknown in English, it is, as a dictionary might say, "archaic".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiulioDEP1

Maybe you can use "travel" instead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fufaiter

I think there is value in learning the literal translation. It made you wonder what would the natural translation be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

"Undertaking a journey"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Undertaking has a different meaning.

Undertaking: "a formal pledge or promise to do something."

"a task that is taken on; an enterprise."

Undertaking is planning a trip or a journey, and eventually starting it.
Making a journey is to be traveling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kociuszko

Should be "travel", sounds better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaVdro

Corinna and Livia are travelling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Context is everything. I go to my local shops on a sunny day. I travel to the county town twice a week. I take a day trip to France three or four times a year. I make a once-in-a-lifetime journey to Ulan Bator, arduous though it is.

Iter facere may be the Roman equivalent of to travel, but even with Roman roads we would probably count what they had to do as "making a journey"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Thank you for the thoughtful post. Here are some lingots for making us think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolinatheowl

Is the term 'make a journey' commonly used in Latin literature?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Iter facere is an expression in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

Why isn't 'iter' declined into the accusative in this expression, since it's the thing being made? (Or is it?..)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Oh, that's the thing. It is accusative! Neuter nouns have the same form for nominative and accusative. It takes time to get used to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

Oh I see. So that's neuter 3rd conjugation then. I think that's the first time I've come across one so far.

Thanks for the explanation! That was confusing me muchly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suhridmulay

Is iter related to itinerary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua_the_Warty

Because of the idiom "iter Facio," this sentence should also translate as, "Corrina and Livia travel," or "Corrina and Livia march."

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