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  5. "Puellae in ludo sunt tacitaeā€¦

"Puellae in ludo sunt tacitae."

Translation:The girls in school are quiet.

August 31, 2019

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nogon

Would "The quiet girls are in school" be a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windrammer

No. The base structure here is "Girls are quiet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rilette

please explain. I also had Nogon's translation. Can you back translate "The quiet girls are in school", please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think it's hard to tell whether the verb, sunt, is telling is WHERE the girls are (Puellae sunt in ludo), or whether it's telling us that they are QUIET (Puellae sunt tacitae).

The separation of Puellae and tacitae may suggest that the adj. is being asserted (i.e., that the girls are quiet).

Tacitae sunt puellae quae in ludo sedent/discunt/student: The girls who sit/learn/study in school are quiet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rilette

Thanks. Is it worth reporting? I don't know how to report after the fact. I think both translations should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(I guess, if you get the sentence again, you could report it.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

"The quiet girls are in school"

Puellae tacitae sunt in ludo.

You can't separate a noun phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Can you please explain what you mean, about separating a noun phrase? I think I might be missing the point--sorry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

A single noun phrase is "the quiet girls" ~ "puellae tacitae".

Interrupt it with a verb and now you have a whole sentence: a subject, the verb, and a subject complement.

"Puellae sunt tacitae" ~ "The girls are quiet."

"They are quiet girls" ~ "[Eae] sunt puellae tacitae."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Thanks for responding, Rae.

I'm no expert, but I do think that adjectives can be separated from nouns in Latin; in prose, I mean (obviously it happens in poetry).

For example, suppose you say: "Puellae veniunt tacitae" (i.e., using a verb other than the copula).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teacon7

I like this guy's pronunciation and reading, but the ellision of both "puellAE + In" and "sunT + Tacitae" made the audio here remarkably difficult to understand. It's good ellision, but perhaps a bit fast for learning purposes. Is this just me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I actually opened this discussion to give kudos to the male speaker's pronunciation. He reads each vowel so distinctly that I always get the "type what you hear" sentences correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/werneran

I agree. They ought to put in a word-by-word recording like the other languages have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

The Latin audio is real people, not a computer voice. This would take a very long time to do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin684684

Which makes more sense: "The girls in school are quiet", or "The girls are quiet in school" ? Would the latter be implied by moving the words around: "Puellae sunt tacitae in ludo" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hendrik_olin

How do you differenciate between 'the girls in school are quiet' and 'the girls are quiet in school' with the first describing girls who happen to be in school and the second describing what the girls are like when they are in school?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpeedWagon353619

This is a interesting subject that has been popping up in my head everytime i stumble upon this question, i hope someone can give some explanation regarding this subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

I'm going to leave my previous post stand for the time being and add the following.

So this is what I would have learned in days gone by as a predicate nominative, correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

That's right. Anything that follows a stative verb is in the nominative case because it directly modifies the subject. It's often referred to as the predicate nominative. Not the most creative term, but it's descriptive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

Well, I don't know if it's not the most creative, I kind of like it. At least I finally and fondly remembered it. Are there other stative verbs? I'll google it, but I would appreciate a response.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Maneo, manere is a nice stative verb:

Puellae in ludo manent tacitae . The girls in school are remaining quiet/silent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

Aah, stative verb, that's intransitive, right? OK, I think I've got it. Something at least. It's coming back.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

No. Transitivity does not even apply to stative verbs. Transitivity only applies to active verbs.

Active verbs are verbs of action. Something is happening. If they are transitive, there is a direct object to receive the action. If they are intransitive, there is nothing being acted upon.

I walk -- intransitive
I mow the lawn -- transitive

Stative verbs are verbs of state. Nothing is happening, they are just describing or defining the subject.

I am a woman.
He looks tired.
This seems easy.
The pie smells delicious.
The blanket feels soft.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

There are other intransitive verbs, like verbs of motion, that do not describe states of being: to go, to come, to walk, to run, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MakrandJos2

No matter how much i practice, i struggle with the pronunciation. And also some sentence translations do not sound appropriate as they would in english.

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