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  5. "Patrem benignum habeo."

"Patrem benignum habeo."

Translation:I have a kind father.

August 31, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerguy_pablo

benign is also a word in English..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speciesUnknown

Kind implies intent, whereas benign does not. But its very subtle. You can have a benign tumor, but not a kind tumor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Basically, "benign" is more passive (it just means "harmless") and "kind" is more active.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speciesUnknown

That also works I guess. But the latin form seems to be active, like Kind so its a reasonable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

I agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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To be clear, I did not mean active vs passive voice. These are adjectives, not verbs. I meant one calls to mind kind actions and other calls to mind a passive state of being.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, benign could be used here also, according to Oxford dictionary, but I guess it's not very common, as it's very very formal.

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/american_english/benign


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevorHuxham

Reminder that the Classical Latin pronunciation of "benignum" should sound more like "beh-NING-num" rather than "beh-NIG-num; the /g/ assimilates to the nasal consonant and turns into the /ŋ/ sound


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrienne-596657

Seems like "good" should be able to replace "kind."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Kindness and goodness are two different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LimaJoe

Pronouncing a glottal stop between e and o in "habeo" doesn't see right to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skiesofblue

Is it just me, or does this male voice sound like he is bored out of is mind?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abrao733245

Why benignum? Does it not be ablativo? -e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

It's accusative. "Patrem benignum" is the direct object of "habeo" and so goes in the accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomCepek1

Isn't Benignum also the label for non-agressive tumors/growths?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It is where we get the English word "benign", yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomCepek1

Medical professional here, and not a native english speaker, though fluent. I was just making sure as I'm building my latin up before exams here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yes, in English we say that non-cancerous growths/tumors are benign. Something can be cancerous but not particularly aggressive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

For medical students, or the ones interested in epistemology:

See Celse here (free book)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_cancer

Hippocrates (circa. 460 BC) described several kinds of cancer, referring to them by the term karkinos (carcinos), the Greek word for crab or crayfish, as well as carcinoma. This comes from the appearance of the cut surface of a solid malignant tumour, with "the veins stretched on all sides as the animal the crab has its feet, whence it derives its name". Since it was against Greek tradition to open the body, Hippocrates only described and made drawings of outwardly visible tumors on the skin, nose, and breasts. Treatment was based on the humor theory of [the] four bodily fluids (...). According to the patient's humor, treatment consisted of diet, blood-letting, and/or laxatives. Celsus (circa 25 BC ) translated karkinos into cancer, the Latin word for crab or crayfish.

In the 2nd century AD, the Greek physician Galen used oncos (Greek for swelling) to describe all tumours, reserving Hippocrates' term carcinos for malignant tumours. (...)It is from Galen's usage that we derive the modern word oncology [and the suffix "oma" (ome) to mean a tumor)

I've searched the word "benignus" and its derivated, in the Celse's text, but I've dound no occurence.

It doesn't mean they didn't make the difference between bening benign tumor and cancerous tumor (malign, malignant, opposite to benign), they did, but it was not called this way (need more search to know how they called it)

This cancerous meaning was already attested in old French for tumors. I think it's a meaning acquired in old French (and maybe other Romance languages when they became distinct dialects?), and that didn't exist in Latin. (unless I find it in a text). And it was borrowed in English.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/benign

If someone knows more than I do about the history of the word "benign" in his language or in Latin, concerning cancers, it would be really interesting to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Shouldn’t it be patrum?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

No. Patrem = singular accusative (I have + direct object = accusative)

Patrum = plural genitive. Owned by the fathers.

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:pater


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, nice is also accepted and right.


[deactivated user]

    It's pretty rude to tell someone they have a strict mother and then tel them you have a kind father xD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ildar1Nekrasov

    Doesn't the voice says "Catrem"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2611

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