https://www.duolingo.com/profile/This_Dark_Soul

Difference of "De" and "El"

Saluton!

I've found that the further I go down my Esperanto tree, I find it harder and harder to tell when I should use either De or El. I know they both mean "of", but I was wondering when I'm suppose to use either or. Does the fact that El also means "from" have to do with the situations it's used in, or is it something else entirely?

Dankon

August 31, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto
August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bajanisto

Eble lernu!-gramatiko helpos vin?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bajanisto

Bonvolu legi ankoraŭ ĉi tiun paĝon ĉe La tuta Esperanto (de Henrik Seppik):

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Dianto-

Tio cxi estas tre utila, dankon!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/This_Dark_Soul

None of these make sense. They all sound like different versions of the same explanation, and I don't see the difference in usage between the De and El examples. Right when I think I understand what is it saying, an example throws a wrench in it. Is there any other way to explain them?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Assuming you read my article on the subject linked above, I'd be interested to see which examples you find in the course which don't fit in with my explanation.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/This_Dark_Soul

It wasn't that they didn't fit in, it's that I don't understand. It's me, not your explanation.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Right when I think I understand what is it saying, an example throws a wrench in it. Is there any other way to explain them?

Perhaps it would be useful for you to explain what you thought you understood, then give an example of what threw the wrench in.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/This_Dark_Soul

Mmm.. It made more sense the second time I read it, but the example that talks about the man running from the bank to the restaurant seems like it could be El. It seems that one could easily say he ran out of the bank to the restaurant and it would mean the same thing. In the article, it says that De is used to convey attachment or belonging, but that it could also be used as From, so why wouldn't it be El when talking about running from the bank to a restaurant, if El also means From?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

How about:

  • Li kuris de la banko al la superbazaro – He ran from the bank to the supermarket.
  • Li kuris el la banko al la superbazaro – He ran out of the bank and to the supermarket.

De... al ... shows starting and stopping point. El still means "out of."

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/This_Dark_Soul

(I'm responding to this comment because it won't let me respond to the other one) That actually makes a lot more sense! Dankon

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miko124896

This software has taught me a lot of English words.

September 2, 2019
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