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  5. "Fur gemmas sub toga celat."

"Fur gemmas sub toga celat."

Translation:The thief hides gems under his toga.

August 31, 2019

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chad_the_Lost

How do I know it's the thief's toga and not just a toga?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It can be "a toga", "the toga", or "his toga", all being implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeCaramanna

How is that implied exactly? It appears it should just be "a toga" or "the toga".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Original Latin does not use possessives as often as English does. We'd only use the his if we needed to distinguish it from someone else toga.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel--M.

Should not the most appropriate and precise answer have offered something like "toga eius", though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablo611443

There are possesives too, like eorum, vostra, etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ByungSooLee

Saying that "his" is implied and therefore required in the answer is absolute malarkey. Then why are such implied words not required for every translation? What makes this one so special?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It's implied, but not required.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErlendBron

There is no latin word for "his" here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyril300603

In this sentence is 'toga' in ablative case? If not, which case is it? If someone is feeling kind please explain. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes, toga here is ablative.

sub can take the ablative (no movement 'under', 'beneath') or the accusative (movement to 'under', 'up to').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zSex3

Nowhere is it written that the thief hides jewelry specifically in his toga.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

We've discussed this above. If you look at the comments before posting you'll often find an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardMRoche

There is no word specifying "his".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

This has been discussed above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sazaju

Since 'his' is implied but not required, I understand that from the English the Latin translation ignores it. But we do the reverse here, so nothing forbids to use 'a' or 'the' instead of his. This is the first time I see something implicit which require such level of interpretation. For me, it should be considered as a difficulty in itself, and thus require a specific level (where each topic would start to use implicit stuff) or a specific topic on its own. Not appear just for this single sentence. Especially if it is common in Latin, as mentionned above.

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