https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Senorita.0

Is duolingo enough?

Do you guys think that just Duolingo is enough for leaning a new language? I am trying to learn Spanish from apps, mostly duolingo, and sometimes i feel that should i take courses? What are your experiences on learning a new language from begining? Can you share your experiences with me?

August 31, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UnHombreElegante

No you cannot become fluent only on Duolingo. You need more resources such as books, movies...

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

Do a search in the Duolingo discussions for "fluent" and you'll have more than enough information.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gatiquo

Duolingo is NOT enough.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b05aplmun.ca

Uh, no. To progress in the language, you need at some point to start reading selections longer than a sentence. (The set of Spanish books my Spanish class is using has the first multi-paragraph reading selection in chapter 2.) You also need to find a way to have actual conversations in your target language. You need opportunities to not just translate, but to write your own sentences and, eventually, your own paragraphs and essays, ideally with some sort of feedback mechanism which will inform you of your errors. Many/most people also find that they need more and more specific grammar instruction than Duolingo provides.

Taking a course would be a way to get all those things in one package. You can also piece together a self-directed learning program that contains all of those elements.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TPOinNC

I supplement Duolingo with online classes -- you can find these with native speakers for less then $10 per hour. Try Verbling.com or Italki.com or, for that matter, search for language schools in major cities of latin america. Most of them will offer classes via Skype (I've done this with a school based in Bogota. If you've got some extra cash I'm a fan of Baselang. It's the Golden Corral of spanish language schools... all you can eat for one price. In this case it's $149 per month for unlimited classes between 6 am and midnight. You just cannot get the auditory/conversational aspects of the language from Duolingo. On the other hand Duo is a great resource for practicing. It dwarfs any other resource I know in terms of the depth and breadth of the practice.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthur932834

I started Italian from gound zero on Duolingo, and am getting something out of it. But it would be much better to have a tutor or native speaker to practice with. I have done quite a bit of French on Duolingo, but mostly using word tiles. I don't automatically recall the words fast enough for actually communicatiing with French people [was in France just recently]. Even when our Duolingo group meets for French, EVERYONE is struggling to converse. Duolingo is helpful more for receptive language, and is very weak on helping learners to produce correct language. But it's free and fun.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagobones

No you have to use what you learn too. But that goes for courses and classes too. Use it or lose it. And by using I mean speak it to people in normal conversations, writing and reading like i am doing now in english (chatting with spanish natives is great and very effective), listen to it a lot being used normaly (news, travel vlogs, movies, whatever). I feel it is enough with memrise, duolingo, hellotalk, and spanishdict for apps to reach a strong b1 level and above. I do now have conversations with people in spain and latin america every day. And I am far from finished with duolingo. I am aiming to pass b1-b2 this autum.

But again, that takes using the language. And that goes for any classes, courses apps whatever. Just like a lot of other things in life, it takes dedication and work over time to become good at something, and it is no magic pill to skip past that..

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brian968059

I'm still in the learning process myself & let me give you my opinion. Duolingo is without a doubt the best free app to learn the fundamentals of a language as it covers abit of everything; from grammar, to pronunciation, to punctuation, to spelling & vocabulary. You will have a solid foundation after completing Duolingo, especially in the major languages that they have developed the most; English, Spanish & French.

With that said, Duolingo or no other app or single method will be enough to get you to fluency. I'd say to compare Duolingo to getting a private language tutor, it teaches you the lessons but you still need to do your homework, study & of course practice speaking/listening to get to fluency outside of the app or private lessons with a tutor.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Senorita.0

Thank you so much for all your answers :)

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikemcdonald58

No, it is just one tool. You can't build a house with just a hammer.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MitchellCo758085

Duolingo is great, but not enough. Neither is going to language classes, for that matter. You need to practice speaking, hearing, reading, and writing the language on your own time.

September 2, 2019
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.