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  5. "Suntne pueri domi?"

"Suntne pueri domi?"

Translation:Are the boys at home?

August 31, 2019

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karatefan

It is a question particle, when the answer can either be yes or no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoolKelani

Could someone explain the purpose of the "-ne" at the end of "suntne"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlossomCoeur94

It indicates that the sentence is a question. Estne Corinna in urbe? Is Corinna in the city?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Like the others said, it marks yes/no questions. Just adding a quick bit of background: Since word order in Latin is so fluid, simply moving the verb to the beginning of the sentence doesn't do the trick. Hence an extra marker. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's a little bit like the ĉu in Esperanto. It changes a statement into a yes-no question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterScham1

To add to what the others said, in classical times Latin did not have any punctuation marks. That means no periods, commas, or question marks. Without punctuation, you need a different type of indicator for questions, and that is what -ne is for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amack2

-ne indicates that it is a question. Without this it would be a statement: "the boys are at home"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenH0

It's like the Esperanto "ĉu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/utrash

If this sentence was about a single boy, could I write 'Estne puer domi?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2604

Yes, exactly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/utrash

Thank you so much!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

From the spoken version: i did get "pueri", but the speaker said it "pooh-ry" rather than "pooh-airy".

I had thought that latin, like italian, should pronounce basically all the vowels. Right? (Even the diphthong "ae" is a fast "ah-ee".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay602054

From the posts so far, I understand that "ne" is a question particle, in this case added to "sunt" - but what does "sunt ne" mean, where the "ne" is a separate word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2604

It's just a wrong answer option.

Ne obliviscamur = lest we forget

Ne X quidem = not even X


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The enclictic interrogative adverb -ne (aggregated to a word) and the "ne" word are two different words. (same etymological root, but both with separated grammar & meanings)

The other "ne", when it's separated, can be a preposition, or an adverb, meaning neither.. nor..., or, whether, etc, according to the other grammatical word you use with it:

Ne... annon/necne (+ subj) = is it... or no.

Ne... an = If... or if...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathy19946

if -ne indicates a question, why is there a question mark at the end? If they used no puctuation, and used word forms to indicate sentence / question, why is Duo putting in what did not exist?

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