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  5. "Two pictures are in the buil…

"Two pictures are in the building."

Translation:Duae picturae sunt in aedificio.

August 31, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rory_OConor

sunt could be at the end


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erica970342

why is duae picturae in aedificium sunt marked incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Because "in aedificium" means "into the building." (preposition in + accus. = into) "in aedificio" means "in the building" (preposition in+ ablative = in, on)

It's a LOCATION (in + abl.) versus MOTION TOWARDS (in + accus.) thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hydrntc

When do we use "aedificia" instead of "aedificio"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Aaedificium" is 2nd declension neuter. "Aedificia" is the plural nominative. Here, we need "aedificio", the singular ablative.

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/all/files/Case_endings_5_decl_1_4.jpg
http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/all/files/Case_endings_5_decl_2_5.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The two forms are very different! For one thing, aedificia is PLURAL, "buildings" (in the nominative and accusative cases); whereas aedificiō is SINGULAR, "building" when it's ablative case, as it is, here, because of the preposition that means IN (= in + abl).

"In buildings" would be in aedificiīs , versus "in the building," in aedificiō .

"The building is large" = Aedificium est magnum . "The buildings are large" = _ Aedificia sunt magna_ .

We see the building = Aedificium vidēmus . We see the buildings = Aedificia vidēmus .

In other words, aedificium, aedificiī , n., is a 2nd declension neuter noun, and for neuter nouns, their nominative and accusative cases are identical; plus, in the plural, their nomin. and accus. cases end in -a.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolaspiper

what about "Duae picturae aedificium sunt"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Aedificium would be either the nominative, or the accusative, so it won't work to mention the place, as an adverbial phrase of place, (and, in addition, without any preposition)

Here it's in + ablative.
Because it's the typical way to express a static place (without move)

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